Woodlark

Lullula arborea

[Wood Lark] (p.155)

All new records

2007

New record

20 Oct – One was heard calling in flight over Castle Hill, during a morning of strong southward diurnal finch and thrush passage (T. Davis, J. Diamond, T. Jones, I. Lakin, K. Rylands). Record accepted by Devon Bird Recorder. This is the first record since 1998 and only the 13th occurrence since 1960.

2009

New record

22 Oct – One was seen and heard calling in flight over Millcombe during the late morning (Richard Taylor). Record accepted by Devon Bird Recorder.

2019

New record

2 May – One calling in flight near the Church at 12:45 hrs on 2 May (Rob Duncan & David Kightley) was seen
and heard again on Castle Hill at 14:45 hrs (Richard Campey). Record accepted by Devon Bird Recorder.

2020

New records

An exceptional autumn for this species, with records on three dates, thought to involve four different birds.

16 Oct – One flew south, calling as it went, over the Ugly and lower Millcombe, during the early morning (Jamie Dunning, Dean Jones et al.). What was considered to be a different individual was seen and heard on the western fringes of Middle Park, just north of Halfway Wall, at 16:30 hrs the same day (Tim Davis & Tim Jones).

22 Oct – One showed well, allowing itself to be photographed, above Benjamin’s Chair (Dean Jones).

4 Nov – One calling in flight over Millcombe on (Dean Jones).

2021

New record

27 Feb – An early spring migrant was photographed foraging in Barton Field (Dean Jones) – only the second Feb record for Lundy, the first dating back nearly 70 years to 1952! Record accepted by Devon Bird Recorder.

2023

New record

2 Nov – One was found crouched in heather near the Rocket Pole, sheltering from the 60 mph wind gusts during the passage of Storm Ciarán (Luke Marriner).

Skylark

Alauda arvensis

[Sky Lark] (pp. 156–158)

Selected new records

2010

Notable autumn-passage count

4 Oct – A count of 100 was among the higher autumn passage totals since The Birds of Lundy was published in 2007, being equalled but not exceeded in Oct 2012 & Oct 2019. The highest count of recent years was 170 on 13 Oct 2022.

2012

Arrival of birds on breeding territories

12 Feb – About ten were apparently already on breeding territories in scattered ones and twos, while a flock of 45 was present on the Airfield. Interestingly, a significant number of birds within the flock were singing for extended periods from the ground (Tony Taylor).

Notable autumn-passage count

26 Oct – A count of 100 was among the higher autumn passage totals since The Birds of Lundy was published in 2007, being equalled but not exceeded in Oct 2010 & Oct 2019. The highest count of recent years was 170 on 13 Oct 2022.

2013

Notable spring count

11 Apr – A count of 120 remains the highest number recorded in spring since The Birds of Lundy was published in 2007.

 

Photo: Skylark in South West Field, 24 Apr 2014 © Richard Campey

2014

Notable spring count

25 Apr – A count of 118 is the second-highest spring total of recent years.

2015

Notable late-winter/early-spring count

2 to 5 Mar – A flock of 87 birds were feeding in Lighthouse Field on 2nd, with at least 90 there on 4th and 95 on 5th.

2016

Notable late-winter count

27 Jan – A loose flock of 46 birds were feeding in the High Street field.

2017

Arrival of birds on breeding territories

Jan to Mar – After two on 25 Jan and six on 4 Feb, the first singing bird was reported on 7 Feb (Dean Jones). Counts rose to 13 on 18 Feb, 20 on 26 Feb and 46 on 22 Mar.

2018

Winter movement

30 Jan – Whilst seawatching from North Light, one was picked up by telescope at considerable distance from the island, flying in off the sea and continuing south over North End (Tim Davis & Tim Jones). Otherwise, very few were present on the island in Jan and the first half of Feb, with only four records of one to three birds in the first half of Jan and maxima of five on 30 Jan and seven on 1 Feb in spite of thorough searching of suitable habitat across the island.

2019

Take-up of territories; breeding census

One was singing on New Year’s Day (Robert Pell) and many breeding territories were taken up during the unusually mild weather in Feb (in contrast with early 2018 – see above). Dean Jones mapped 49 song territories during the breeding season.

Notable autumn-passage count

15 Oct – A count of 100 was among the higher autumn passage totals since The Birds of Lundy was published in 2007, being equalled but not exceeded in Oct 2010 & Oct 2012. The highest count of recent years was 170 on 13 Oct 2022.

2022

Notable autumn-passage count

13 Oct – A count of 170 remains the highest number recorded during autumn passage since The Birds of Lundy was published in 2007.

2023

Nocturnal surveys deliver a significant ringing total

Concerted use of thermal imaging equipment at night, particularly during the autumn, resulted in 66 Skylarks being ringed, 27 of these between 2 & 5 Oct alone. Looking back at previous years, the numbers ringed in both 1996 & 1997 were slightly higher, at 72 in each of the two years, although the majority of these were pulli (nestlings). This was part of a targeted research effort during the 1990s, which resulted in 405 Skylarks being ringed in just seven years, from 1994 to 2000, inclusive. This respresents nearly two-thirds of all the Skylarks ever ringed on Lundy (1947 to the end of 2022). The 2023 total is therefore not only the highest for the best part of 25 years and the third-highest ever, but also (by a considerable margin) the highest number of fully grown Skylarks ringed in a single year.

Shore Lark

Eremophila alpestris

[Horned Lark] (p.158)

All new records

2014

New record

12 Jun – A male in breeding plumage was watched for about 45 minutes at North End as it perched on rocks, fed on the ground and sub-sang in the area between the top of the steps down to North Light and John O’Groats (Tim Davis & Tim Jones). Record accepted by DBRC; the fifth for Lundy, the last dating back to 22 May 1992. It is striking that four of the island's six Shore Lark records have now been in May or Jun, given that this is usually thought of as a wintering species in Britain.

Short-toed Lark

Calandrella brachydactyla

[Greater Short-toed Lark] (p.155)

All new records

2008

New record

19 May – One along the main track at the North End, between John O’Groats and the head of Gannets’ Combe (T.J. Davis, J.R. Diamond, T.A. Jones et al.). Record accepted by DBRC; the 17th occurrence on Lundy.

2012

New records

8 May – One in the open area immediately seaward of Quarry Cottages was seen well but flew down over the sidelands and out of sight when disturbed by a Wheatear (Ian Searle).

1 Jun to 6 Jul – Two feeding together on the main track at Halfway Wall on the evening of 1 Jun (Chris & Carol Baillie) were seen the following day by many observers and both remained in the same area until 12 Jun; this is the first time that two have occurred together on the island. Thereafter, only one was seen, on 13, 14, 27 & 29 Jun and 6 Jul (many observers; photographed by Paul & Mike Hopes on 6 Jul).

12 & 13 Sep – One in the stonecrusher area of the Tent Field on 12 & 13 Sep (Richard Taylor & Tony Taylor; photographed on 12th by Michaela Cozens) seems likely to have been different from the summer individuals (and treated by DBRC as such), though indications are that the bird was in active moult, which would lend weight to the possibility that one had remained undetected on the island for two months.

Records accepted by DBRC; the 18th to 20th occurrences on the island.

2013

New record

23 Oct – One near Quarter Wall (Richard Campey). Record accepted by DBRC; the 21st for Lundy.

2014

New record

18 May – One was seen and photographed near Quarter Wall during the Devon Birds day trip (Phil Abbott, Jon Turner et al.). Record accepted by DBRC; the 22nd for Lundy. Photo © Phil Abbott.

 

2018

New record – subject to acceptance by DBRC

13 May – One on track along the West Side approximately 100 m south of the Old Light at 15.20 hrs, then on the track near the stonecrusher at 17.35 hrs. On the latter occasion it flew to the corner of Lighthouse Field nearest the Cemetery. It was seen – and photographed – for a final time at 19.25 hrs (Sam Bosanquet).

Sand Martin

Riparia riparia

pp.158–159)

Selected new records

 

Earliest and latest since 2006 (last year covered in full by The Birds of Lundy): Earliest 24 Feb 2019 (the earliest ever for the island, preceding by more than 10 days the previous earliest date of 7 Mar 1983); Latest 3 Nov 2009 (the latest ever for the island, beating by a day the previous record-holder, one on 2 Nov 1978).

2008

New spring-passage maximum count

16 Apr – 1,000 were estimated to have passed through the island – the highest spring count on record (the previous peak being 800 on 12 Apr 1982 and 20 Apr 1992). As of the end of 2023, this remains by far the highest spring-passage total ever recorded on the island.

2009

New last date in autumn

2 & 3 Nov – The last of the year, a single bird, was the latest ever recorded on Lundy (see above).

2011

Notable autumn-passage count

22 Aug – A count of 300 was one of the higher autumn-passage totals of recent years.

2012

Extended spring passage

Late May & early Jun – Birds were still passing through at the end of May and into early Jun, perhaps reflecting difficult weather conditions en route, with counts still reaching double digits on 26, 30 & 31 May.

2015

Extended spring passage

May & Jun – A trickle of migration continued throughout May and well into Jun, concluding with one on 13th.

2017

Notable autumn-passage count

16 Sep – A count of 250 was one of the higher autumn-passage totals of recent years.

2019

Exceptionally early spring passage

Feb & Mar – The first of the year were two on the extraordinarily early date of 24 Feb, with a further singleton on 28th. After four on 5 Mar, spring migration really got under way in the second half of the month, with peaks of 51 on 24th and 55 on 26th.

The exceptionally early spring migration in 2019 coincided with unusually mild weather in Feb. This contrasts markedly with 2018, when a cold, late spring (after the 'Beast from the East') meant that the first Sand Martin was not logged until 15 Mar and counts did not reach double digits until 7 Apr.

Notable autumn-passage count

8 Sep – A count of 500 remains (as of the end of 2023) the highest autumn-passage count since The Birds of Lundy was published in 2007 (though still a long way short of the all-time autumn maximum of 2,000 on 18 Sep 1978).

Swallow

Riparia riparia

[Barn Swallow] (pp.159–160)

Selected new records

 

Earliest and latest since 2006 (last year covered in full by The Birds of Lundy): Earliest 16 Feb (five), beating the previous earliest date – 11 Mar in both 2000 & 2007 – by over three weeks; Latest 16 Nov 2015 (one).

2007

Breeding confirmed

Breeding was not reported until early Sep, when a pair had large young in a nest in the village, although this is likely to have been a second or third brood.

2008

Notable spring-passage count

26 Apr – An estimated 5,000 passed through the island – at the time the second-highest one-day total on record for spring migration (counts reached this figure on three dates in April and May 2004, while 6,000 were estimated on 26 April 2005). Other exceptional one-day estimates during 2008 spring passage included 3,000 on 16 & 27 April and 20 May. All of these totals are dwarfed, however, by estimates of 15,000 in Apr 2009 and May 2012 (see below)

Breeding confirmed

Nests were built in the gas store, the Church porch and the fire-engine shed, with fledged young around the village on 26 Jul. A nest with very small young, presumably a second brood, was in the fire-engine shed on 31 Aug, and four young fledged from the Church porch in the first week of Sep; also a probable second brood.

2009

New record set for spring-passage maximum

22 Apr – A new record was set for both spring and autumn migrations when 15,000 were estimated to have passed through. (NB this figure was equalled on 1 May 2012).

Breeding confirmed

With nests in at least four different locations – the beach building, Church porch, gas store in lower Millcombe, and fire-engine shed – 2009 was the best year on record in terms of the number of breeding pairs, though the often wet and windy weather from Jul to Sep may have suppressed the number of young fledged successfully due to starvation and/or chilling. The nest in the fire-engine shed held two dead, but fully feathered chicks and two live chicks on 3 Sep. However, at least four young fledged from the gas store and were being fed in Millcombe on 8 Aug.

High autumn-passage counts

10 & 27 Sep – Counts of 5,000 on both dates are among the higher autumn-passage day-totals since publication of The Birds of Lundy in 2007, matching the identical estimate made on 25 Sep 2015, though eclipsed by an estimate of 12,000 on 23 Sep 2022.

2010

Breeding confirmed

Active nests were found in the gas store in lower Millcombe and in farmyard buildings in the first week of Jun, with presumably a second (or even third) brood about to fledge from the gas store on 7 Sep.

Late date in autumn

15 Nov – One on this date was unusually late, though there were later individuals in both 2015 and 2020 (see below), whilst the latest ever recorded remains one on 3 Dec 1978.

2011

Early date in spring

12 Mar – 20 on this date were the second earliest spring migrants on record (the earliest being on 11 Mar in both 2000 and 2007).

Breeding confirmed

9 Jul – A nest was located at the southern end of Government House (a new site) on 9 Jul (L. Jaggard).

2012

Exceptional spring-passage count

1 May – A colossal 15,000 estimated (equalling the record set in Apr 2009), based on spot counts, averaging 100 birds per minute passing over St John’s Valley between 11:00 and 13:00 hrs, with movements continuing until 18:00 hrs (Colin McShane).

Breeding confirmed

During the period 29 May to 2 Jun, nests were located in the gas store in lower Millcombe, in the store shed at the southern end of Government House, and in the pigsty at Pig's Paradise, with birds also prospecting in the Church porch. An adult was sitting on a nest at the latter site 19-21 Jun, while nest-building in the gas store durin the same period suggested loss of the first nest. On 25 Aug, two active nests included a pair feeding two young in the Church porch and a pair in the gas store. Three chicks were ringed inthe gas store on 29 Aug.

2013

Delayed spring passage

Numbers in Apr/May were quite low in comparison with recent years; presumably a reflection of the cold, late spring in 2013. The fact that as many as 417 were still moving north on the late date of 5 Jun strongly suggests that migration was significantly delayed.

Breeding confirmed

A pair was holding territory around Pig's Paradise on 2 Jun and a pair was feeding young in the gas store in lower Millcombe on 30 Aug and 12 Sep.

2014

Breeding confirmed

During the period 7–12 Jun nesting pairs were found in the gas store in lower Millcombe and in the Casbah. Birds were also seen in the Church porch and Pig's Paradise pigsty, but there was no evidence of of active nests at either site at that time. A pair at the Casbah had young about a week old on 21 Aug; probably a second brood.

2015

Late date in autumn

16 Nov – One flying over St Helen's Field was unusually late, though there was a later individual 2020 (see below), whilst the latest ever recorded remains one on 3 Dec 1978.

Breeding confirmed

A pair nesting in the Church porch were collecting mud from Pig's Paradise on 12 Jun and the nest contained half-grown young on 16 Jul. A pair was prospecting inside the gas store in lower Millcombe in Jun and another pair was seen regularly around the village at the same time, but no further nests were discovered.

High autumn-passage count

25 Sep – A count of 5,000 is the one of the higher autumn-passage day-totals since publication of The Birds of Lundy in 2007, matching by the identical estimates made on 10 & 27 Sep 2009, though eclipsed by an estimate of 12,000 on 23 Sep 2022.

2016

Breeding attempts confirmed, but outcome unknown

A pair was nest building in the Church porch on 8 &10 Jun (outcome unknown) and there was an occupied nest in the Casbah at the end of Jul
(outcome also unknown).

2017

Breeding confirmed

Pairs bred at the Timekeeper’s Hut (= Felix Gade memorial) where a nest with three or four young was found on 1 Aug (Peter Williams), and at the Tillage/Brick Field pig-sty, where a recently fledged juvenile was seen on 4 & 5 Jul (Mike Archer) and a nest built unusually low to the ground contained a second brood of at least three chicks on 6 Aug (Dean Jones).

2018

Breeding confirmed

Pairs were feeding young chicks in the Church tower and in the shed at the southern end of Government House on 10 Jun (Dean Jones). Successful breeding was confirmed when four fledglings, from a nest in the pigsty, were perched on a fence in Brick Field on 2 Jul and a fourth active nest was found at Quarry Pond on 20 Jul (Dean Jones).

2019

Exceptionally early spring passage

The first of the year were two over the Village during the late morning of 16 Feb, with another three elsewhere during the day, making this the earliest ever date for Swallow on Lundy.

The exceptionally early spring migration in 2019 coincided with unusually mild weather in Feb. As for Sand Martin, this contrasts markedly with 2018, when a cold, late spring (after the 'Beast from the East') meant that the first Swallow was logged on 15 Mar but counts were generally low until late Apr.

Notable spring-passge count

12 May – A  conservative estimate of 5,000 was one of the higher day-totals of recent years.

Breeding confirmed

A total of four pairs attempted to breed, but only three managed to fledge chicks (Tillage/Brick Field pigsty, Quarry Pond and Church porch). The first fledglings were seen in the Church porch on 5 Jul, and the same pair of adults were incubating a second brood by 25 Jul, but this and another pair that attempted a second brood both seemed to fail at the early egg stage.

 2020

Breeding confirmed

Three pairs nested: in the Church porch, next to the Black Shed, and in a natural site at Quarry Pond. Four young fledged from the Church porch on 4 Jul, whilst the other two pairs both fledged three young. A second brood was attempted in the Church Porch and young were being fed during the first half of Sep, but they failed to fledge successfully.

Exceptionally late date in autumn

30 Nov – One over Millcombe was the latest since The Birds of Lundy was published in 2007, though just short of the latest ever record on 3 Dec 1978.

 2021

Spring passge disrupted by bad weather

Poor weather in the second week of May meant that many migrating Swallows were struggling to feed – some were warmed up in the Lodge bathrooms and later released. Both Swallows and martins were grounded on the Landing Bay beach on 8th and several were found dead in the gas store and Casbah in Millcombe on and around 10th. Cold, wet and extremely windy conditions struck again on 20 May, when passage hirundines were grounded on the Beach Road and along the tracks in Millcombe.

Breeding confirmed

In all, three pairs made breeding attempts: in the Church porch where seemingly one young fledged, while a subsequent attempt there failed at the egg stage; another pair tried at Government House but failed; and another next to the Black Shed also failed and moved on. There was no indication of nesting at either Quarry Pond or the pigsty in 2021.

Notable spring-passge count

25 Apr – An estimate of 5,000 was one of the higher day-totals of recent years.

2022

Breeding confirmed

Three pairs bred: a pair successfully fledged eight chicks from two broods in the Church Porch; a pair in the porch of Old House North failed at the egg stage but went on to fledge four chicks from the Gas Store; and another pair successfully fledged two chicks from the Casbah.

Exceptional autumn-passage count

23 Sep – 12,000 were estimated have flown over the Castle in four hours – the highest autumn-passage day-total since publication of The Birds of Lundy in 2007.

2023

Breeding confirmed

 

Ringing

Ringing control: A Swallow ringed as a first-year bird on Lundy on 27 Sep 2009 (ring no. X984589) during a day of strong visible migration when an estimated 5,000 passing through the island, was controlled at Icklesham, East Sussex on 30 Sep 2009 (3 days, 374 km, E 95º).

Ringing control: A Swallow ringed as an adult bird on Lundy on 22 Apr 2009 (ring no. X226968) was controlled at Estanca Escoron, Ejea de Los Caballeros, Zaragoza, Aragón, Spain on 30 Sep 2011; (891 days; 1,049 km; SSE 166º). When controlled in Spain, this bird would have been on at least its fourth south-bound autumn migration.

Ringing control: A Swallow ringed as a first-year bird on Lundy on 04 Oct 2011 (ring no. L954436) was controlled at a roost site near St Saviour Hospital, Jersey, Channel Islands on 12 Oct 2011 (8 days, 287 km, SE 141º). See also 2017 & 2021 rapid onward movements from Lundy to the Channel Islands.

Ringing control: A Swallow ringed as a first-year bird on Lundy on 21 Sep 2012 (ring no. Y705778) was controlled at Forninhos, Odemira, Beja, Portugal on 17 Oct 2012 (26 days; 1,543 km; SSW 192º). Remarkably, given how many have been found in Spain, this was the first British-ringed Swallow to have been controlled in Portugal.

Ringing recovery: A Swallow ringed as a first-year bird on Lundy on 11 Oct 2009 (ring no. L026271) was found dead in the Oleh region of Nigeria, on 06 Mar 2013 (1,242 days; 5,188 km; S 169º). This bird was most likely in a spring staging area feeding up for what would have been its eighth trans-Saharan flight and its fourth breeding season in Europe.

Ringing control: A Swallow ringed as a first-year bird on 14 Sep 2017 (ring no. S218358) was controlled at Longis Nature Reserve, Alderney, Channel Islands, on 16 Sep 2017 (2 days; 240 km; SE 133˚). See also 2011 & 2021 rapid onward movements from Lundy to the Channel Islands.

Ringing control: A Swallow ringed as a first-year bird on Lundy on 20 Sep 2021 (ring no. ANL4439) was controlled at Longis Bay, Alderney, Channel Islands, on 21 Sep 2021 (1 day; 240 km; SE 133˚). See also 2011 & 2017 rapid onward movements from Lundy to the Channel Islands.

House Martin

Delichon urbicum

[Common House Martin] (p.161)

Selected new records

 

Earliest and latest since 2006 (last year covered in full by The Birds of Lundy): Earliest 8 Mar 2020 (one); Latest 7 Nov 2009 (one).

2008

New record set for spring-passage maximum

20 May – An exceptional passage saw an estimated 3,600 passing through – a record for the island; the previous highest daily count was 1,500 on 13th May 2004.

2009

Notable autumn-passage count

27 Sep – An estimated 750 is the third highest autumn total on record after 1,000 on 3 & 4 Oct 2005 and 800 on 16 Sep 2010.

Late date in autumn

7 Nov – A single bird on this date remains (as of the end of 2023) the latest since The Birds of Lundy was published in 2007 (though the latest ever was on 4 Dec 1979).

2010

Notable autumn-passage count

16 Sep – An estimated 800 is the second highest autumn total on record (after 1,000 on 3 & 4 Oct 2005).

2012

Notable spring-passage count

3 May – An estimated 500 was one of the higher spring-passage totals of recent years (although a long way short of the 2008 record peak).

2013

Delayed spring passage

Apr to Jun – As for other hirundines, spring migration was delayed by unusually cold weather, with none recorded until 6 Apr when one was seen near North Light. Numbers were low throughout the rest of Apr and most of May. The lateness of the season was confirmed when 40 flew north on 28 May, followed by the spring passage peak of 170 on 5 Jun.

2017

Notable autumn-passage count

6 Oct – An estimated 700 was one of the higher autumn totals of recent years (and the fourth highest ever).

2019

Notable spring-passage count

12 May – An estimated 700 was one of the higher spring-passage totals of recent years (although a long way short of the 2008 record peak).

2020

Early date in spring

8 Mar – A single bird on this date remains (as of the end of 2023) the earliest spring migrant since The Birds of Lundy was published in 2007 (though the earliest ever was on 27 Feb 1998).

Late date in autumn

4 & 5 Nov – A single bird was one of the later autumn records and only two days short of the latest ever, on 7 Nov 2009.

2021

Notable spring-passage count

12 May – An estimated 1,500 was the highest spring day-total since the record count of 3,600 in May 2008.

Red-rumped Swallow

Cecropis daurica

(p.161)

All new records

2007

New record

19 May – One along the East Side (M. Clements). This constitutes the eighth Lundy record and the fourth in spring. Record accepted by DBRC.

2012

New record

3 May – While bird ringers were mist-netting migrant ‘common’ or Barn Swallows, a Red-rumped Swallow appeared and perched (appropriately enough) on bramble bushes along the main track outside Brambles, allowing many photos to be taken. The bird departed, as suddenly as it had arrived, with a passing group of Barn Swallows (Dave Clifton, Derren Fox, Scott Petrek et al.). Record accepted by DBRC – the ninth Lundy record and the fifth in spring.

Red-rumped Swallow, Brambles, 3 May 2012
© Derren Fox

2017

New record

27 May to 2 Jun – One was over Quarry Beach and later over Millcombe (Charles Crundwell, Chris Townend) on 27 May and over the Village on 28 May (Richard Taylor). What was presumed to be the same bird was seen near South Light on 2 Jun (Tony Taylor), then feeding below the Castle at 11.10 hrs and at Quarter Wall Copse at 13.10 hrs on 3 Jun (Dean Jones, Chris Townend). These sightings constitute the 10th record for Lundy (the last in May 2012) and the sixth in spring. Record accepted by DBRC.

American Cliff Swallow

Petrochelidon pyrrhonota

Subject to acceptance, a new addition to the Lundy List since The Birds of Lundy was published in 2007.

All new records

2023

New record – subject to acceptance by BBRC

29 Sep – A first-winter bird was seen well – but briefly – in flight below the Terrace at 16:20 hrs by Chris Baillie. It flew north but did not reappear and was not relocated elsewhere on the island, although many of the most likely suitable areas were checked before dusk. If accepted by BBRC, this will be the first record for the island and follows an exceptional influx to Britain and elsewhere in north-west Europe in association with fast-moving Atlantic depressions (including a number of ex-hurricanes and tropical storms) during the early autumn of 2023.

Long-tailed Tit

Aegithalos caudatus

(pp.225–226)

All new records

2008

New record

12 Nov to 27 Dec – Eight arrived on 12 Nov, with sightings on a further six days up to and including 19 Nov, involving from three to seven individuals. In Dec, three were seen on 24th and two on 27th.

2009

New record

1 Jan to 15 Mar – The two birds remaining at the end of 2008 were seen on six dates in Jan, mainly in Millcombe, but also around the Campsite on one occasion. They were together in Quarter Wall Copse on 3 Feb, after which one was seen in apparently poor condition attempting to feed on the ground in freezing rain at the top of Millcombe on 5th. Thereafter, one was in Millcombe on 15 Feb, but two were reported again on 21st. Finally, one was in Millcombe on 14 & 15 Mar. This is the first time that Long-tailed Tits are known to have overwintered on Lundy, though there have been two previous one-day midwinter records, in Dec 1995 and Jan 1984.

2010

New record

20 & 27 Nov – Seven on 20th and three in brambles outside Pig’s Paradise/Quarters on 27th.

2012

New record

28 Oct – One in Millcombe (Tim Jones et al.).

2016

New records – including new highest-recorded spring count

17 Mar to 12 Apr – Between one and seven birds were present in Millcombe, particularly around the Ugly (numerous observers). There have been just six previous occurrences in spring, including two birds that overwintered in 2008/09. The highest 2016 counts – seven on 28 Mar (Joshua Harris) and six on 31st – exceed the previous spring-time record of five, set as long ago as Mar 1973.

10 Oct – Three flew south over South West Point (Kevin Waterfall).

2017

New records

27 Oct – Six were trapped and ringed in Millcombe on 27 Oct (Rob Duncan, Justin Zantboer et al.).

2019

New record

21 Oct – One feeding in sycamores in Millcombe (Dean Jones).

2020

New record

14 Oct – One was working its way south, calling as it went, in the incongruous setting of the bracken and boulder-strewn sidelands above Jenny’s Cove (Tim Davis, Tim Jones).

2021

New records

18 Mar – Two feeding in Quarter Wall Copse flew off north towards the Terrace (Dean Jones).

21-31 Mar – One in Millcombe was trapped and ringed on 30th (Dean Jones).

 

Ringing recovery: A ring found in a Peregrine pellet on Lundy on 12 Jul 2017 came from a Long-tailed Tit that had been ringed as an adult on Lundy (ring no. HRC365) on 3 Apr 2016.

Cetti’s Warbler

Cettia cetti

(p. 195)

Selected new records

 2009

New record

22 Oct – One seen by the Terrace Trap (A. Jayne) was later trapped, ringed and photographed (R. Taylor). This is only the third occurrence of this species on Lundy following singles in 2003 and 2006, both also in the second half of Oct.

Cettis Warbler 2009 RichardTaylor copyCettis Warbler, Terrace, 22 Oct 2009
© RichardTaylor

2018

New record

17 Oct – One seen briefly in Millcombe (Richard Campey). The fourth for Lundy.

2019

New record

14 Oct to 17 Nov – One in dense vegetation on the bund of Millcombe Pond on 14 Oct (Andy Jayne & Tim Jones) was seen briefly in the willow clump in St John’s Valley the following day (James Diamond et al.). Presumably the same bird was back at Millcombe Pond on 1 Nov (Chris Baillie), at the head of St Helen’s stream, where it reaches the Upper East Side Path, on 16 Nov and again at Millcombe Pond on 17th (Dean Jones). The fifth record for the island.

2020

New record

18 Oct – One trapped and ringed in Millcombe during the early morning (Rob Duncan, Dean Jones). The sixth record for Lundy.

2022

New record

10 Oct – One was trapped and ringed in Millcombe (Stuart Cossey, Angus Croudace, Tom Wright). The seventh record for Lundy and the sixth individual to be ringed.

Wood Warbler

Phylloscopus sibilatrix

(p.213)

All new records

 

Earliest and latest since 2006 (last year covered in full by The Birds of Lundy): Earliest 16 Apr 2011 (one); Latest 17 Sep 2009 (one).

2007

New records

26 Ap to 6 May – Singles on seven dates; not recorded in autumn.

2008

New records

2 to 17 May – Records on five dates, with two birds present on 3rd & 17th.

14 Sep – One; the only autumn-passage record.

1 Jul – One reported in the LFS logbook, but no details were provided. While the species itself is not rare on Lundy, this would constitute the earliest ‘autumn’ sighting by more than a fortnight. There is a risk that less experienced observers might confuse juvenile (typically very yellow) Willow Warblers, which begin moving through Lundy in July, for this species.

2009

New records

26 Apr to 13 May – Singles on 26 & 27 Apr and 13 May.

17 Sep – One; the only autumn-passage record.

2010

New records

5 to 11 May – Singles on 5th, 6th & 11th; not recorded in autumn.

2011

New records

16 Apr & 7 May – Singles on both dates; the latter a singing bird.

27 Jul & 7 Aug – Singles were reported on both dates, though in the absence of further details, possible confusion with juvenile Willow Warblers cannot be excluded.

2012

New records

5 to 20 May – Recorded on six dates: singles on 5th & 7th, two in Millcombe on 6th, and further singles on 18th to 20th, inclusive. Not recorded in autumn.

2013

Not recorded; the first 'blank' year since 1970

Not recorded during either spring or autumn passage. Though always a scarce migrant on Lundy, 2013 marks the first year since 1970 that Wood Warblers were not recorded at all. This is hopefully just a blip and could reflect gaps in observer coverage at key times. However, it may also reflect the species’ parlous conservation status; the UK breeding population declined by 65% between 1995 and 2010.

2014

New record

25 Apr – One feeding in sallows by the Terrace Heligoland Trap (Richard Campey) was the only record for the year.

2015

New records

May & Sep – A slightly better showing after two very poor years, comprising single spring migrants on three dates in mid-May, followed in autumn by one on 14 & 16 Sep, with two present on 15 Sep (Dave Chown, Tim Davis et al.).

2016

New record

8 May – A single bird during the annual Devon Birds day-trip (Richard Swinbank), was the only record for the year.

2017

New records

13 Apr to 8 May – Singles on 13 & 30 Apr and 8 May were the only records for the year.

2018

New record

3 May – A singing male in Millcombe (Rob Duncan).

5 Sep – One in Millcombe on 5 Sep (Josh Harris).

2019

New record

Apr/May – A male singing in Millcombe on 29 Apr (Dean Jones) and one trapped and ringed in Millcombe on 7 May (Rob Duncan & David Kightley).

There were no autumn records.

2020

New records

27 & 28 Apr – Two on 27th, of which one in the Battlements sycamores and one along the Lower East Side Path above White Beach); and one in upper Millcombe on 28th (all Dean Jones).

7 Sep – One in Millcombe (Tim Davis & Tim Jones).

2021

New records

14 May  – One photographed at Quarter Wall Copse was feeding at ground level in unseasonably cool and damp conditions, slowly working its way north along the sidelands (Tim Jones).

1 to 9 Sep – Single birds were logged on five dates during this period: in Millcombe on 1st & 2nd (Jamie Dunning & Dean Jones) and in the Terrace willows on 7th (Eleanor Grover), with possibly the same bird in Quarter Wall Copse on 8th & 9th (Dean Jones, Paul Dietrich & Peter Ward).

2022

New records

15 May  – A male was singing by Millcombe Pond on 15th (Tim Jones, Jamie Dunning et al.) and one was at Gannets’ Combe on the same day (Paul St Pierre). One was feeding below the Terrace on 16th (Tim Davis).

2023

New records

5 May  – One was seen briefly in Smelly Gully, lower Millcombe (Stuart Cossey).

21 Sep – One was trapped and ringed in Millcombe (Luke Marriner et al.). This was the 51st Wood Warbler to be ringed on Lundy but only the fifth since publication of The Birds of Lundy in 2007, reflecting the species' rapid decline in Britain.

Western Bonelli’s Warbler

Phylloscopus bonelli

(p.212)

All new records

2010

New record

4 Sep – One trapped, ringed and photographed on the Terrace (R. Taylor, A.M. Taylor). Record accepted by BBRC – the second accepted occurrence of this species on Lundy. Photo © Tony Taylor.

2023

New record – subject to acceptance by BBRC

3 & 10 Sep – One was watched and photographed in St Helen's Copse on 3rd (Luke Marriner), whilst a non-calling Bonelli's Warbler sp., thought to be Western, and likely the same individual, was watched and photographed on the Terrace on 10th (Angus Croudace).

Subject to acceptance, the 3rd record for the island.

2007

Report assessed as ‘not proven’

14 Sep – The submission for one watched for about half-an-hour in lower Millcombe was assessed by BBRC as ‘not proven’.

2022

Report assessed as ‘not proven’

25 Apr – The submission for an unidentified Bonelli's Warbler species (Western or Eastern Bonelli's Warbler P. bonelli or P. orientalis) photographed along the track to Old Light during a period of strong easterly winds was assessed by BBRC as ‘not proven’.

Yellow-browed Warbler

Phylloscopus inornatus

(pp.210–211)

All new records

 

Correction p. 210, third paragraph, fifth line: 2006 is quoted as one of the years in which Yellow-browed Warbler was recorded on 16 September. Owing to the lack of an adequate supporting description, the logbook entry for one seen on 16 September 2006 was not accepted by LFS/DBRC. It was therefore excluded from the listing on p.211 and the reference on p.210 should also have been deleted.

 

Earliest and latest since 2006 (last year covered in full by The Birds of Lundy): Earliest 16 Sep 2017 (one); Latest 16 Nov 2013 (one).

2007

New records

8 to 18 Oct – Recorded daily with a record maximum count of at least eight different individuals present on 13th, the highest one-day count ever recorded on Lundy. Birds were seen in Millcombe, St Helen's Copse, Quarter Wall Copse and the willow clump growing in the small quarry between VC Quarry and the Terrace Trap. The eight birds recorded on 13th were all in Millcombe (multiple observers including C. Baillie, T. Bedford, R. Campey, A.L. Cooper, S.L. Cooper, T. Davis, J. Diamond, T. Jones, I. Lakin, J.W. Leonard, R.M Patient and K. Rylands). Records accepted by DBRC. 2007 was the fifth consecutive autumn for this species on Lundy.

2008

New records

28 Sep to 29 Oct – Another very good year; recorded on 14 days, with a maximum of at least five and probably up to eight present on 17 Oct. Ten different birds were trapped and ringed during the autumn and it is likely that at least 20 different individuals passed through the island. As usual, most were seen in Millcombe/St John's Valley, but others were near Gannets' Combe, along the Terrace/Quarries and in St Helen's Combe. These records, contributed by many observers, have been accepted by DBRC. 2008 was the sixth consecutive autumn for this species on Lundy.

2009

New records

19 Sep to 30 Oct – At least nine (and possibly up to 12) different individuals occurred: one in Millcombe, 19 Sep (I. Lakin); one in Millcombe, 2 Oct (T. Jones et al.); one trapped and ringed in Millcombe, 13 Oct (T. Ball); one trapped and ringed below Brambles, 15 Oct (T. Ball), with perhaps the same bird seen on 16 Oct (J. Leonard); one trapped and ringed in Millcombe, 18 Oct (R. Taylor, A.M. Taylor); one on the Terrace early morning of 23 Oct (C. Baillie), with what was presumed to be the same bird trapped and ringed in Millcombe that afternoon (A.M. Taylor); one ringed in Millcombe 2pm on 26 Oct (R. Duncan, R. Taylor et al.), with another unringed bird seen on the Terrace mid-afternoon that day (A. Jayne); one in Millcombe on 27 Oct may have been the individual ringed on 26th (R. Bower); one ringed in lower St John’s Valley on 30 Oct (R. Duncan, T. Palmer, A.M. Taylor). Records acccepted by Devon Bird Recorder.

2010

New records

2 to 22 Oct – Singles in Millcombe 2, 3 & 5 Oct (T. Jones et al.). Two caught, ringed and photographed in Millcombe on 12 Oct (T. Ball et al.). One seen on the Terrace on 18 Oct. One trapped, ringed and photographed in Millcombe on 22 Oct (Tony Taylor et al.). Records accepted by Devon Bird Recorder.

2011

New records

3 to 31 Oct – One in St. Helen’s Copse on 3 Oct. One in St. Helen’s Copse and another in Millcombe on 4 Oct. One in Millcombe on 8 Oct. (All above records T. Bedford, R. Campey, T. Davis, J. Diamond and T. Jones). One on the Terrace on 12 Oct (J. Sanders). One trapped and ringed in Millcombe on 15 Oct (T. Ball et al.). One in bracken above Quarter Wall Copse on 21 Oct (L. Phillips, A. Watts). One in Millcombe on 30 & 31 Oct (A. Jayne). Records accepted by Devon Bird Recorder.

2012

New records

26 Sep to 14 Oct – One trapped, ringed and photographed, Millcombe, 26 Sep (Derek Baggott, Andy Turner). On 7 Oct, one trapped, ringed and photographed, Millcombe (Tim Ball et al.) and one at North Light (around the solar panels) (Arfon Williams). Three all morning in St Helen’s Copse, with one briefly in Millcombe on 12 Oct (Ivan Lakin & Kevin Rylands). Five trapped and ringed, four of which were photographed, Millcombe, 14 Oct (Tony Taylor et al.) – the highest number ever ringed in one day on Lundy. Records accepted by Devon Bird Recorder.

Photo: Yellow-browed Warbler trapped in Millcombe, 14 Oct 2012 © Richard Taylor

2013

New records

15 Oct to 16 Nov – During the latter part of Oct, singles were recorded as follows: Millcombe on 15th (M. Davis); Quarter Wall Copse on 23rd (Richard Campey); upper Millcombe and by the main track at Quarter Wall on 25th (Tom Bedford, James Diamond); and Millcombe on 28th (Tim Davis). One, mist-netted in Millcombe, was ringed on 16 Nov (Richard & Rebecca Taylor), the latest date this species has ever been recorded on the island. Records accepted by Devon Bird Recorder.

2014

New records

21 Sep to 30 Oct – Singles were in Millcombe on 21 Sep (Andy Jayne) and in the clump of willows next to the Terrace Heligoland Trap on 25 Sep (Kathy Evans). One in St Helen’s Copse on 5 Oct seems likely to have been the bird trapped and ringed in Millcombe the following day (Luke Philips, Tony John & Tony Taylor). One was in Millcombe on 28 Oct (James Diamond et al.), with a second bird on the Terrace (Chris Baillie). Five in Millcombe on 29 Oct, of which three were trapped and ringed (Rob Duncan et al.). One of the ringed birds was still present in Millcombe on 30th (Justin Zantboer). Records accepted by DBRC. Photo below of bird trapped in Millcombe on 6 Oct 2014 © Tony Taylor.

Photo: Yellow-browed Warbler trapped in Millcombe, 6 Oct 2014 © Tony Taylor.

2015

New records

17 Sep to 16 Oct – Single birds were in St Helen’s Copse at 11.00 hrs and in the willow clumps next to the Terrace Trap and south of the Quarry Beach cable-way between 12.30 and 14.00 hrs on 17 Sep (Dave Chown, Tim Jones). It is unclear whether one or two birds were involved. Two were feeding with crests and Coal Tits in upper Millcombe on 10 Oct (James Diamond, Tim Jones, Ivan Lakin et al.). One was in the sycamores above the gas store in lower Millcombe during the early morning of 15 Oct, with two in upper Millcombe during the evening of the same day (James Diamond, Tim Jones et al.). One was again around the gas store on 16 Oct (many observers). Records accepted by Devon Bird Recorder.

2016

New records

9 Oct to 4 Nov – Two were in Millcombe on 9 & 10 Oct, and there were two in St Helen’s Copse and one at Quarter Wall Copse on 10th (D. Evans et al.), followed by singles in Millcombe on 15th (Andrew Jewels) and 21st (Chris Baillie). Four were trapped and ringed in Millcombe on 25 Oct (Rob Duncan, Justin Zantboer et al.), whilst two new (unringed) birds were in Millcombe on 28th, one of which was trapped and ringed (Rob Duncan, Justin Zantboer et al.). One unringed bird was in Millcombe on 29th (Chris Baillie) and finally, one was in lower Millcombe on 3 & 4 Nov (Richard Campey, James Diamond). Records accepted by Devon Bird Recorder.

2017

New records

16 Sep to 2 Nov – There were records on 10 dates, involving at least 10 individuals; details below:

One calling from St Helen’s Copse on 16 Sep (Nik Ward); one in Millcombe on 25 Sep (Chris Dee); one in Smelly Gully on 7 & 8 Oct (Tim Davis, Dean Jones); a different bird along the Upper East Side Path above St Helen’s Copse on 8 Oct (Tim Davis, Tim Jones); one at Quarry Pond on 12 Oct (Chris Baillie, Julian Bowden et al.); one near the stonecrusher on 18 Oct (Chris & Carol Baillie); three trapped and ringed on 26 Oct (Rob Duncan, Justin Zantboer et al.); an unringed bird near the stonecrusher on 30 Oct (Andy Jayne); one in the same area on 1 Nov (Paul Holt); and one feeding near Brambles on 2 Nov (Mike Beck). Records accepted by Devon Bird Recorder.

2018

New records

4 to 26 Oct – Records on 14 dates, probably involving 15 or more individuals, with a maximum of four on 24th; details below:

Two on 4th, one in Millcombe and one in bracken along the East Side Path below Halfway Wall (Tim Davis & Tim Jones); one on 5th in Millcombe, presumed the same as on 4th (Tim Jones); two on 11th, one in Millcombe (Smelly Gully) and one on the Terrace (Dean Jones); one on 15th in Millcombe (Andy Bell, Richard Campey & Malcolm Davies); three on 16th, two in Millcombe and one along the Terrace (Richard Campey & Malcolm Davies); one on 17th in Millcombe (Richard Campey & Malcolm Davies); one on 19th in St Helen’s Copse (Dean Jones); singles on 20th, 21st & 22nd in Millcombe (Andy Jayne); four on 24th in Millcombe, of which three trapped and ringed (Justin Zantboer et al.), and two in Quarter Wall Copse (Paul Holt); two on 25th in Millcombe (Paul Holt, Justin Zantboer et al.); and one on 26th in Millcombe (Paul Holt).

Records accepted by Devon Bird Recorder.

2019

First spring record for Lundy

20 Apr – One feeding in sycamores in upper Millcombe (Andy Trout et al.) constitutes the first spring record for Lundy.

New autumn records

10 to 23 Oct – Recorded on eight dates, with a maximum of five (all in Millcombe) on 15th (Tim Davis, James Diamond et al.). All other dates involved ones and twos. The only birds away from Millcombe were singles between the Terrace Trap willows and the Timekeeper’s Hut on 19th and at Quarter Wall Copse on 23rd. As ever the total number of individuals is difficult to assess, but there were at least ten.

Records accepted by Devon Bird Recorder.

2020

New records

19 Sep to 12 Nov – During autumn passage, logged on 21 dates from 19 Sep (one in sycamores above the Casbah, Millcombe) to 12 Nov (one in Quarter Wall Copse), with a maximum of five on 22 Oct (two in Milcombe, one in Quarter Wall Copse, one in the Terrace Trap willows, and one in ‘Rüppell’s Quarry’ – the small quarry with willows to the south of VC Quarry, officially named Howard’s Quarry). Most other records concerned ones and twos only, but there were three on 12 Oct. Unusually, there were several records of birds feeding on the ground. One was on the muddy margins of Millcombe Pond on 12 Oct, whilst another spent much of 14 Oct feeding in the lee of the main track wall alongside Tillage & Brick Fields. Another individual, also on 14th, was feeding on the ground, out in the open, on the sunny, sheltered edge of St Helen’s Field above Millcombe, together with a Chiffchaff and several Goldcrests.

2021

New records

11 to 22 Oct – Reflecting a very poor autumn for this species in the UK and across Western Europe more generally, there were records on just seven dates in this period, all in or around Millcombe and St Helen’s Copse. Two were present on 14th & 15th, with single birds on the other five dates (James Diamond et al.). Three were trapped and ringed (Rob Duncan et al.).

2022

New records

14 Sep to 12 Nov – Recorded on 12 dates during this period: one in the Secret Garden (lower Millcombe) on 14 Sep (Stuart Cossey); one along the Terrace (Angus Croudace) and another in Millcombe (Tom Wright) on 19 Sep; one with a Treecreeper by Quarry Pond on 3 Oct (Darrin Dowding, Paul Bullock); one in Millcombe on 9 Oct (Matthew Broadbent); three trapped and ringed in Millcombe on 11 Oct (Stuart Cossey, Nik Ward, Tom Wright), of which two still present on 12th (Angus Croudace); one in Millcombe on 18 Oct (Greg Conway); two in Millcombe on 20 Oct (Greg Conway, Tim Davis et al.); one by Stoneycroft on 21 Oct (David Lindo); two feeding together in Smelly Gully (lower Millcombe) on 22 Oct (Chris Baillie, Tim Jones, Paul Holt); one below Government House on 25 Oct (Chris Baillie); and one along the Terrace on 12 Nov (Stuart Cossey).

Records accepted by Devon Bird Recorder.

2023

New records – subject to acceptance by Devon Bird Recorder

15 Oct – One in Millcombe, first seen in sycamores in the gully running down from Brambles (Tim Davis) and shortly afterwards on the flanks of the Ugly (Tim Jones) was heard calling in Millcombe later in the day but could not be relocated visually.

20 to 27 Oct – One in Quarter Wall Copse, found at more or less the same time and in the same place as a Red-breasted Flyctacher, during the late afternoon of 20th (James Diamond) was seen and heard calling by multiple observers over the following week.

20 Oct – One was feeding actively in the willows near the Heligoland Trap on the Terrace during the late afternoon, shortly after one had been found in Quarter Wall Copse (James Diamond).

22 Oct – One was seen briefly in the large Turkey Oak leaning across the Lower East Side Path near St Helen's Copse during the late afternoon (Tim Jones).

Pallas's Warbler

Phylloscopus proregulus

[Pallas's Leaf Warbler] (p. 210)

All new records

2016

New record

25 Oct – One feeding in gorse and on the ground close to the Rocket Pole (Rob Duncan, Simon Slade, Justin Zantboer et al.)

27 & 28 Oct – One trapped and ringed in Millcombe on 27th was still present on 28th and thought to be a different individual to that seen on 25th (Rob Duncan, Justin Zantboer et al.).

Record accepted by DBRC, although the Committee concluded that the presence of two different individuals had not been proven. This is only the fifth record for Lundy.

Pallass Warbler Rocket Pole 25Oct2016 Simon SladePallas's Warbler Rocket Pole, 25 Oct 2016
© Simon Slade

Pallass Warbler in flight Rocket Pole 25Oct2016 Simon SladePallas's Warbler Rocket Pole, 25 Oct 2016
© Simon Slade

Pallass Warbler in hand 27Oct2016 Justin ZantboerPallas's Warbler trapped in Millcombe,
27 Oct 2016 © Justin Zantboer

2018

New record

25 Oct – One trapped and ringed in Millcombe (Rob Duncan, Justin & Ellie Zantboer et al.).

Record accepted by DBRC – the sixth for Lundy.

2022

New record

4 Nov – One was trapped and ringed in the 'Secret Garden', lower Millcombe, on 4 Nov (Chris Dee, Stuart Cossey).

Record accepted by DBRC – the seventh for Lundy and the fifth individual to be ringed.

Sulphur-bellied Warbler

Pylloscopus griseolus

Species added to the Lundy List since The Birds of Lundy was published in 2007.

All new records

 2021

First for Lundy – first for Britain, second for the Western Palearctic

8 Jun – A singing male first seen and heard on a wall near the Old Light in the early morning, later relocated to Millcombe, where it remained for the rest of the day, enabling enterprising twitchers who chartered dive and fishing boats to catch up with it by evening. Unfortunately, it had gone by the following morning, after a night of clear skies and light winds, to the disappointment of many other would-be admirers. A full account of the momentous events of that day, written by David Price, Paul St Piérre and Dean Jones, can be found on the BirdGuides website here. Sulphur-bellied Warblers breed in dry, mountainous areas of Central Asia from Pakistan and Afghanistan, as far as western parts of China and Mongolia, migrating south to Indian wintering grounds. If accepted, this will be only the second Western Palearctic occurrence, following one on the Danish island of Cristiansø, in the Baltic Sea, in May 2016. Record accepted BBRC and species admitted to the British List by BOURC.

Willow Warbler

Phylloscopus trochilus

(pp.216–217)

Selected new records

 

Earliest and latest since 2006 (last year covered in full by The Birds of Lundy): Earliest 16 Mar 2013 (one); Latest 7 Nov 2008 (one).

2007

Early autumn-passage fall

26 Jul – Some 200, mostly juvenile birds, primarily in Millcombe/St John’s Valley and along the East Side.

2009

Birds showing characteristics of northern race

24 & 27 Aug – Single first-year birds showing the characteristics of P. t. acredula were trapped and ringed in St John’s Valley on 24 Aug and on the Terrace on 27 Aug (John Walshe).

2011

Early autumn-passage fall

23 & 24 Jul – Autumn passage was underway by the end of Jul, when Andrew Cleave witnessed an impressive fall on 23rd, with birds “along the East Side from Millcombe almost as far as Gannets’ Bay – the numbers had thinned out at that point but there were still birds to be seen flitting through the bracken and feeding amongst rocks. The greatest density was between Millcombe and the Quarries – we did not do a count, but there always seemed to be 10-15 birds in view as we headed north, so the total must have run into hundreds of birds”. Large numbers were still present early the following afternoon, when, during a day trip, many were seen in Millcombe and along the walls between the High Street Gate and Old Light (T. Jones). Note: This paragraph was accidentally duplicated within the 2012 Lundy Bird Report.

2012

Notable spring-passage count

8 Apr to 2 May – Large numbers of spring migrants were grounded during a month of very unsettled weather. The first real influx brought 40 on 8 Apr. Thereafter, present virtually daily to the end of the month, with counts of 40 or more on a further 14 dates and maxima of 200 on 19th, 250 on 21st & 24th, an exceptional 1,000 on 26th & 27th and 200 on 28th. In just four days, from 11 to 14 Apr, Chris Dee ringed over 180 Willow Warblers – more than were ringed on Lundy during the whole of 2011 – including the 100,000th bird to be ringed under the auspices of the LFS. High numbers continued into early May, with 500 on 1st and 200 on 2nd.

The count of 1,000 on 26 & 27 Apr was equalled on 26 Apr 2013 and 29 Apr 2019 (see below). These four dates represent the highest spring-passage totals since publication of The Birds of Lundy in 2007. There have only ever been three counts of more than 1,000; the record standing at 3,000 on 15 Apr 1987.

Breeding confirmed

Two pairs were feeding young in June – a pair in Hanmers/Castle Copse and a pair in Millcombe, below Brambles (Tim Davis & Tim Jones). Although one or two singing males have apparently held territory at various of the East Side combes and copses in most years, 2012 remains the only year in which breeding has been confirmed since publication of The Birds of Lundy in 2007.

2013

Notable spring-passage count

26 Apr – A fall of 1,000 occurred, of which 110 were ringed. The figure of 1,000 equalled the estimate for 26 & 27 Apr 2012 and 29 Apr 2019 (see below). These four dates represent the highest spring-passage totals since publication of The Birds of Lundy in 2007. There have only ever been three counts of more than 1,000; the record standing at 3,000 on 15 Apr 1987.

2017

Bird showing characteristics of northern race

31 Oct – A bird showing characteristics associated with the northern race P. t. acredula was in lower Millcombe (Paul Holt).

2018

Early autumn-passage influx

25 Jul – A total of 117, including both adults and juveniles, counted following an overnight influx of migrants.

2019

Notable spring-passage count

29 Apr – A major fall occurred, estimated at 1,000 birds. This equalled the totals logged on 26 & 27 Apr 2012, 26 Apr 2013, and 29 Apr 2019 (see above). Between them, these four dates represent the highest spring-passage totals since publication of The Birds of Lundy in 2007. There have only ever been three counts of more than 1,000; the record standing at 3,000 on 15 Apr 1987.

Early autumn-passage influx

27 Jul – At least 95 were present in Millcombe following an overnight arrival of migrants.

2022

Notable autumn-passage total

1 Aug – The total of 400 logged on this date remains the highest autumn-passage count since publication of The Birds of Lundy.

 

Ringing

Ringing control: LFS received late notification of a Willow Warbler ringed as an adult at South Walney, Barrow-in-Furness, Cumbria on 17 Aug 1994 (ring no. 3L5103 ) was controlled on Lundy on 09 Apr 1995 (235 days; 334 km; SSW 198°). Note: Due to the late notification this control is not included in The Birds of Lundy.

Ringing control: A Willow Warbler ringed as a first-year female at Bere Regis, Dorset, on 18 Aug 2007 (ring no. 3Z7473) was controlled on Lundy on 02 May 2008 (258 days; 179 km; WNW 286°).

Ringing control: A Willow Warbler ringed as a first-year female at Portland Bill, Dorset, on 06 Aug 2007 (ring no. CBN108) was controlled on Lundy on 28 Apr 2008 (266 days; 172 km; WNW 295°).

Ringing control: A Willow Warbler ringed as a first-year bird at Gibraltar Point, Lincolnshire, on 23 Aug 2005 (ring no. BAT291) was controlled on Lundy on 05 May 2008 (986 days; 402 km; WSW 238°).

These three movements of birds ringed on the south and east coast during autumn migration and controlled on Lundy during subsequent northward migrations in spring 2008 fit well with the overall pattern of ringing movements to/from Lundy described in The Birds of Lundy.

Ringing control: A Willow Warbler ringed as an adult female at Portland Bill, Dorset, on 20 Apr 2009 (ring no. CKB975) was controlled on Lundy on 24 Apr 2009 (4 days; 172 km; WNW 295°). This is the eighth ringing movement involving Lundy and Portland Bill and the second time a Willow Warbler ringed at Portland Bill when arriving in the UK on spring migration has been trapped a few days later on Lundy.

Ringing control: A Willow Warbler ringed as a first-year bird on Lundy on 16 Sep 2009 (ring no. CVJ608) was controlled at Dunsby, Bourne, Lincolnshire on 03 Sep 2011 (717 days; 348 km; NE 58°).

Ringing control: A Willow Warbler ringed as an adult on Lundy on 22 Apr 2011 (ring no. DER481) was controlled at Isla Grosa, San Xavier, Murcia, Spain on 07 Apr 2012 (351 days; 1,514 km; S 169°).

Ringing control: A Willow Warbler ringed as an adult male at Portland Bill, Dorset, on 18 Apr 2010 (ring no. DBE110) was controlled on Lundy on 12 Apr 2012 (725 days; 172 km; WNW 295°).

Ringing control: A Willow Warbler ringed as an adult at South Milton Ley, Devon on 09 Apr 2013 (ring no. HBC211) was controlled on Lundy on 12 Apr 2013 (3 days; 116 km; NNW 331°).

Ringing control: A Willow Warbler ringed as an adult at Porth Hellick, St Mary’s, Isles of Scilly on 23 Apr 2013 (ring no. ERA078) was controlled on Lundy on 25 Apr 2013 (2 days; 180 km; NE 40°).

Ringing control: A Willow Warbler ringed as a first-year bird at Fuentecantos, Soria, Castilla y León, Spain on 25 Aug 2012 (ring no. PF5507) was controlled on Lundy on 19 Apr 2014 (602 days; 1,052 km; N 351°).

Ringing control: A Willow Warbler ringed as an adult on Lundy on 15 Apr 2014 (ring no. HBP721) was controlled at Durlston Country Park, Dorset on 11 Aug 2015 (483 days; 202 km; ESE 109°).

Ringing control: A Willow Warbler ringed as a first-year male on Lundy on 22 Apr 2018 (ring no. KEH410) was controlled on Skokholm, Pembrokeshire, on 26 Apr 2018 (4 days; 74 km; NW 325°).

Ringing control: A Willow Warbler ringed as a first-year bird on Skokholm, Pembrokeshire, on 30 Aug 2018 (ring no. KYN356) was controlled on Lundy on 29 Apr 2019 (242 days; 74 km; SE 145°).

Ringing recovery: A Willow Warbler ringed as an adult on Lundy, on 22 Apr 2021 (ring no. NLN559) was found dead (hit glass) at South Glen Dale, South Uist, Western Isles, on 4 May 2021 (12 days; 683 km; NNW 346°).

Ringing control: A Willow Warbler ringed as a first-year bird at Kingshill Farm, Leigh Sinton, Worcestershire on 27 Aug 2020 (ring no. NBC633) was controlled on Lundy on 19 Apr 2021 (235 days; 194 km; WSW 236°).

Ringing control: A Willow Warbler ringed as a juvenile at Nanjizal, Land's End, Cornwall on 21 Jul 2021 (ring no. NNY071) was controlled on Lundy on 10 Apr 2022 (263 days; 143 km; NNE 31°).

Ringing control: A Willow Warbler ringed as a first-year bird at Erme Valley, Harford, Devon on 6 Aug 2022 (ring no. PAY872) was controlled on Lundy on 17 Apr 2023 (8 months, 11 days; 98.5 km NNW).

Ringing control: A Willow Warbler ringed as a first-year bird at A Coruña, Coruña, Galicia, Spain on 09 Sep 2022 (ring no. Madrid/Icona RY8411) was controlled on Lundy on 17 Apr 2023 (602 days; 912 km; NNE).

Ringing control: A Willow Warbler ringed as a full-grown bird on Lundy on 22 Apr 2023 (ring no. PAE234) was controlled on Calf of Man, Isle of Man on 28 Apr 2023 (6 days; 321 km N).

Ringing control: A Willow Warbler ringed as an adult on Lundy on 04 May 2023 (ring no. PAE435) was controlled on Skokholm, Pembrokeshire, on 10 May 2023 (6 days; 73.5 km NW).

Chiffchaff

Phylloscopus collybita

[Common Chiffchaff] (pp.214–215)

Selected new records

 

Earliest and latest since 2006 (last year covered in full by The Birds of Lundy): Earliest 4 Mar 2013 (one); Latest 19 Nov 2009 (two). Excludes presumed wintering birds seen in mid to late-Dec in 2008, 2010, 2012, 2014 & 2016, in Jan/Feb 2019 and in early Feb 2011.

 

Photo: Chiffchaff on Lundy, Oct 2013 © Richard Campey

2007

Birds showing characteristics of northern or eastern races

13 Apr - One in Millcombe showed characteristics of the Fennoscandian race P. c. abietinus (A. Jayne). Record accepted by DBRC.

1 Nov - One in Millcombe showed characteristics of the Fennoscandian race P. c. abietinus (A. Jayne). Record subject to acceptance by DBRC.

2008

Birds showing characteristics of northern or eastern races

12 to 22 Oct – Single birds showing characteristics of the Fennoscandian race P. c. abietinus were seen in Gannets' Combe on 12 Oct (A.L. Cooper) and along the East Side between Quarter Wall Copse and St Helen's Copse from 19 to 21 Oct (C.A. Holt et al.), with at least two birds present in the same area from 22-24 Oct (T. Bedford et al.). One showing characteristics of the Siberian race P. c. tristis was also seen along the East Side on 21 & 22 Oct (C.A. Holt, K. Rylands et al.). Details of the latter bird have been submitted to BBRC, which is conducting a review of the status of P. c. tristis in Britain.

Winter record

22 to 24 Dec – One.

2010

Confirmed breeding

A pair was seen carrying food in Millcombe on 30 May and singing males were holding territory in the Beach Road copse below Hanmers, Millcombe, St Helen’s Copse and Quarter Wall Copse during the first week of Jun. A pair was also seen carrying nesting material in Millcombe. Adults were seen feeding young in Lower Millcombe on 15 & 16 Jul. This is the first record of confirmed breeding since 1994, but it is thought that other breeding attempts during the intervening years may have been missed due to low observer coverage in summer.

Winter record

29 Dec – One.

2011

Winter record

1 to 6 Feb – What was presumably a single individual, was first reported on 1 Feb, then daily from 4 to 6 Feb – the first Jan or Feb record for the island since 1989.

Notable autumn-passage count

4 Oct – A major overnight arrival of 300 Chiffchaffs (along with similar numbers of Blackcaps and 100 Goldcrests), constituted one of the highest autumn-passage counts on record for Lundy.

2012

Birds showing characteristics of northern or eastern races

23 Oct – One trapped and ringed in Millcombe, during a period of easterly winds, showed characteristics of one of the eastern races, perhaps P. c. tristis. Shed feathers were retained for DNA and isotope analysis. Initial results indicate that the bird was indeed a ‘Siberian Chiffchaff’ P. c. tristis, but further studies are being conducted.

Winter record

27 Dec – One.

2013

Exceptional autumn-passage count

5 Oct – A fall, coinciding with a major arrival of Goldcrests, Blackcaps and other migrants, brought an exceptional 500+ to the island, of which 49 were ringed.

As of July 2020, this remains the highest number (spring or autumn) recorded on Lundy since The Birds of Lundy was published in 2007.

2014

Winter record

30 Dec – One.

2015

Birds showing characteristics of northern or eastern races

8 Jun – A very pale ‘washed out’-looking bird was in Millcombe. It showed almost no greenish or yellowish tones in its plumage, having largely khaki upperparts and whitish underparts, typical of Chiffchaffs from breeding populations in north-east Europe (Tim Jones).

2016

Exceptional spring-passage count

3 Apr – A count of 400 is, by some way, the highest spring total since The Birds of Lundy was published in 2007. This remains the case as of the end of 2023.

Breeding evidence

In late May a male was singing in Quarter Wall Copse and two birds were singing in Millcombe, where a pair was seen carrying nesting material. Two males continued to hold territory in Millcombe 7–11 Jun and at least one presumed female was present. Further singing males were heard in Quarter Wall Copse on 8 Jun and St Helen’s Copse on 9th & 10th. Whilst it seems likely that at least one breeding attempt was made, this remains unconfirmed.

Winter record

14 to 17 Dec – One was seen on three dates during this period.

2017

Birds showing characteristics of northern or eastern races

26 to 31 Oct – Singles showing characteristics of ‘Siberian’ Chiffchaff P. c. tristis were trapped and ringed in Millcombe on 26 & 27 Oct. Another was seen in lower Millcombe on 31 Oct. Records under review by DBRC, but Devon Birds policy is to ascribe individuals definitively to subspecies level only when supported by evidence from DNA analysis.

2018

Confirmed breeding

Jun – A pair was nest building in lower Millcombe on 6 Jun (Tim Davis & Tim Jones) and fledglings were seen in 'Smelly Gully' on 20 Jun (Dean Jones &
Zoë Barton), suggesting at least two breeding attempts were made.

Birds showing characteristics of northern or eastern races

Calling individuals showing characteristics of ‘Siberian’ Chiffchaff P.c. tristis were in Millcombe on 24 Oct (Ellie & Justin Zantboer) and 27 Oct (Dean Jones). Records accepted by Devon Bird Recorder. On the latter date, a probable ‘Siberian’ Chiffchaff was also seen near the Landing Shed (Dean Jones), but this bird unfortunately did not call – a feature required for acceptance by Devon Birds.

2019

Winter records

Jan to Mar – Between one and four overwintering birds were recorded during Jan and Feb, and into early Mar.

Confirmed breeding

Jun & Jul – Breeding was confirmed for three pairs: one was nest-building on the Terrace on 12 Jun (Chris Baillie); one was collecting food in the Terrace willows on 7 Jul (Dean Jones); an adult was feeding chicks in sycamores near the Battlements on 24 Jul (Dean Jones); and an adult was feeding very young chicks in Smelly Gully on 11 Aug – almost certainly a second brood but far too soon to be the same pair that were feeding young at the end of Jul (Dean Jones).

This is the third year in which successful breeding is known to have occurred since publication of The Birds of Lundy, following other confirmed instances in 2012 and 2018, and probable breeding in 2016.

Birds showing characteristics of northern or eastern races

Non-calling birds showing plumage typical of ‘Siberian’ Chiffchaff P. c. tristis were seen in Millcombe from 9 to 17 Jan, inclusive (Dean Jones) and on 5 & 6 Apr (Jo King, Philip Lymbery), and in bracken at Threequarter Wall Bay on 15 Oct (Andy Jayne). In line with the current policy of Devon Birds, which only accepts as ‘confirmed’ records of calling ‘Siberian’ Chiffchaff, these three occurrences have been accepted by the Devon Bird Recorder as ‘grey chiffchaffs’ (unidentified P. c. tristis/abietinus).

2020

Winter records

Jan & Feb – There were records of single birds on four dates 10-24 Jan & 10 Feb.

Confirmed breeding

Song was heard throughout May and early Jun and a pair were seen copulating in Millcombe on 10 Jun. However, just one fledgling was being fed by adults in the same area on 14 Jul (Dean Jones), perhaps indicating that productivity had been adversely affected by poor weather earlier in the month. A second pair were feeding three fledglings in upper Millcombe on 20 Jul – again suggestive of poor productivity.

Birds showing characteristics of northern or eastern races

Individuals with plumage and calls typical of ‘Siberian’ Chiffchaff P.c. tristis were seen in Millcombe on 1 Dec (one bird) and at several locations on 26 Nov (a small influx of four: two in Millcombe; one in the Terrace willows and on the sidelands above Quarry Beach; and one in the Village next to Quarters). A fifth bird, showing plumage and call characteristics possibly better matching ‘Northern’ Chiffchaff P. c. abietinus was also logged on 26 Nov, together at one point with one of the ‘Siberian’ Chiffchaffs below the Terrace (all records Dean Jones). In addition, an individual showing plumage and call characters of one of the grey northern or eastern races, possibly P. c. abietinus, was trapped and ringed in Millcombe on 8 May (Dean Jones). MtDNA analysis of shed body feathers from an individual trapped and ringed in Millcombe on 23 Oct indicated maternal lineage as P. c. abietinus (Prof. J. Martin Collinson & Thomas Shannon, University of Aberdeen per Dean Jones). A good candidate for abietinus was also foraging at Millcombe Pond on 6 Nov (Dean Jones). Records of ‘Siberian’ Chiffchaff subject to acceptance by Devon Bird Recorder.

2021

Winter records

Jan – Single birds were seen in Millcombe on 16th & 23rd.

Confirmed breeding

Two pairs made nesting attempts in Millcombe but only one pair fledged young. Adults were seen with nesting material on 26 May (likely a second nest after an earlier failure), delivering food to nestlings on 3 Jul and feeding a fledgling in the ‘Secret Garden’ (lower Millcombe) on 8 Jul. A later brood of three fledglings was being fed in Millcombe on 21 Aug.

Birds showing characteristics of northern or eastern races

Presumed tristis Chiffchaffs were recorded in Millcombe in Oct on 13th, 15th (two, of which one trapped and ringed), 16th (two trapped and ringed) and 22nd (two trapped and ringed). Shed body feathers from three of those ringed were retained for DNA analysis. At the end of the year, a possible tristis was by Paradise Row on 21 Dec, with a definite, calling bird by Millcombe Pond on 24 Dec (both Stuart Cossey). Record of ‘Siberian’ Chiffchaff on 24 Dec accepted by Devon Bird Recorder (call required for acceptance). Acceptance of ringed individuals pending DNA results.

2022

Winter records

Jan & Feb – Single birds were seen on 18 & 20 Jan. Up to two were then seen regularly from 27 Jan to 11 Feb.

Confirmed breeding

Males were heard singing in Millcombe, St Helen’s Copse and Quarter Wall Copse. However, the only confirmed breeding pair was in Millcombe when an adult was seen with food on 30 Jun and four fledged chicks were being fed on 9 Jul.

Birds showing characteristics of northern or eastern races

Two individuals with plumage and calls typical of ‘Siberian’ Chiffchaff P. c. tristis were noted. The first was calling by Millcombe Pond on 9 Jan (Stuart Cossey). The other was first seen around the Village allotments on 29 Nov (Jamie Dunning et al.) and then seen and heard below Government House on 30 Nov (Stuart Cossey). Records accepted by Devon Bird Recorder.

 

Ringing

Ringing control: A Chiffchaff ringed as an adult on Lundy, on 03 May 2008 (ring no. BCE900) was controlled at Hartland Point, Devon on 05 May 2008 (2 days; 22 km; SSE 151°).

Ringing control: A Chiffchaff ringed as a first-year bird on Lundy, on 18 Sep 2010 (ring no. DER272) was controlled at Cruzihna Field Studies Centre, Mexilhoeira Grande, Algarve, Portugal (51 days; 1,593 km; SSW 192°) on 08 Nov 2010. This is the second Lundy-ringed Chiffchaff to be found in Portugal in November, but the first from the Algarve region. The timing makes it seem equally likely that the bird was either already in its wintering area or still on autumn migration.

Ringing recovery: A Chiffchaff ringed as a first-year bird on Vlieland, West Frisian Islands, The Netherlands, on 03 Oct 2011 (ring no. Arnhem AAN722) was found freshly dead (killed by a bird, probabl Water Rail), on Lundy on 15 Oct 2011 (12 days; 695 km; WSW 251°).

Ringing control: A Chiffchaff ringed as a first-year bird at Nanjizal (near Land’s End), Cornwall on 12 Sep 2010 (ring no. DLX466) was controlled on Lundy on 25 Apr 2013 (956 days; 144 km; NNE 31°).

Ringing control: A Chiffchaff ringed as a first-year bird on Skokholm, Pembrokeshire on 15 Sep 2014 (ring no. EXX834) was controlled on Lundy on 29 Sep 2014 (14 days; 74 km; SE 145°).

Ringing control: A Chiffchaff ringed as a full-grown bird on Schiermonnikoog, West Frisian Islands, The Netherlands, on 09 Sep 2014 (ring no. Arnhem ACX038) was controlled on Lundy on 14 Apr 2015 (217 days; 780 km; WSW 251°).

Ringing control: A Chiffchaff ringed as an adult on Lundy on 28 Apr 2015 (ring no. HHC382) was controlled on Bardsey Island, Gwynedd on 14 & 15 Apr 2016 (352 days; 178 km; N 358°).

Ringing control: A Chiffchaff ringed as a second calendar-year bird at Essex Farm, Alderney, Channel Islands on 29 Mar 2016 (ring no. Jersey 176388) was controlled on Lundy on 03 Apr 2016 (5 days; 238 km; NW 313°).

Ringing control: A Chiffchaff ringed as a second calendar-year bird on Lundy on 04 Apr 2016 (ring no. HRC451) was controlled at High Bridge, Williton, Somerset on 06 Apr 2016 (2 days; 95 km; E 91°).

Ringing control: A Chiffchaff ringed as an adult at Gibraltar Point, Lincolnshire on 17 May 2016 (ring no. HXK626) was controlled on Lundy on 10 Nov 2016 (177 days; 402 km; WSW 238°).

Ringing control: A Chiffchaff ringed as a second-year bird at Nanjizal (near Land's End), Cornwall on 22 April 2017 (ring no. KDY004) was controlled on Lundy on 27 Apr 2017 (5 days; 144 km; NNE 31°).

Ringing control: A Chiffchaff ringed as a second calendar-year bird on Lundy on 20 Apr 2018 (ring no. KEH251) was controlled on Great Saltee Island, Wexford, Ireland on 28 Apr 2018 (8 days; 171 km; NW 309°).

Ringing control: A Chiffchaff ringed as a first-year bird on Lundy, on 17 Sep 2019 (ring no. LEH396) was controlled on Bardsey Island, Gwynedd on 27 Mar 2020 (192 days; 178 km; N 358°).

Ringing control: A Chiffchaff ringed as a first-year bird on Lundy, on 09 Oct 2021 (ring no. NLN918) was controlled Kilpaison March, Rhoscrowther, Pembrokeshire on 14 Nov 2021 (36 days; 62 km; NNW 335°).

Ringing control: A Chiffchaff ringed as a first-year bird at Loch of Leys, near Banchory, Aberdeenshire on 23 Aug 2022 (ring no. PBA402) was controlled on Lundy on 17 Apr 2023 (7 months, 25 days; 671 km SSW).

Ringing control: A Chiffchaff ringed as a first-year bird at Titchfield Haven National Nature Reserve, Hampshire on 22 Sep 2022 (ring no. PAT192) was controlled on Lundy on 21 Apr 2023 (6 months, 30 days; 243 km W).

Green Warbler

Pylloscopus nitidus

Species added to the Lundy List since The Birds of Lundy was published in 2007

All new records

2018

First for Lundy

7 Oct – One in Millcombe (Tim Davis & Tim Jones). Record accepted by BBRC – the first for Lundy and Devon.

Green Warbler Lundy 07Oct2018 Tim JonesGreen Warbler, Millcombe, 07 Oct 2018
© Tim Jones

Greenish Warbler

Phylloscopus trochiloides

[Greenish/Two-barred Warbler] (pp.209–210)

All new records

2016

New record

5 Jun – A singing male was in the sycamores below Brambles (Rebecca & Richard Taylor). Record accepted by DBRC. This is only the fourth record for Lundy, the last dating as far back as Aug 1978.

Greenish Warbler Lundy 05Jun2016 Rebecca TaylorGreenish Warbler near Brambles, 5 Jun 2016
© Rebecca Taylor

Greenish Warbler Lundy 05Jun2016 Richard TaylorGreenish Warbler near Brambles, 5 Jun 2016
© Richard Taylor

Sedge Warbler

Acrocephalus schoenobaenus

(pp.196–198)

Selected new records

 

Earliest and latest since 2006 (last year covered in full by The Birds of Lundy): Earliest 9 Apr 2020 & 2021; Latest 24 Oct 2013 (one).

2009

High autumn-passage count

24 Aug – A count of 30 remains (as of the end of 2023) the highest autumn-passage day-total since publication of The Birds of Lundy.

2010

Breeding confirmed

One was singing in Lower Millcombe on 6 Jun and breeding was confirmed when an adult was seen carrying food in St John’s Valley on 17 Jun and an adult female with a brood patch was trapped there on the same day. Fledged young were seen near Brambles on 14 & 16 Jul. The only previous instances of confirmed breeding on Lundy occurred in 1934 and 1935.

2011

Breeding season

Although birds were seen sporadically during the late spring and early summer, there was no reported evidence of breeding behaviour to follow-up on confirmed breeding in St John’s Valley in 2010.

2012

High spring-passage counts

2-4 May – Counts of 50 on each of these three dates remain (as of the end of 2023) the highest spring-passage day-totals since publication of The Birds of Lundy in 2007.

2013

Exceptionally late autumn record

24 Oct – One in Millcombe (Tim Davis) was the latest ever recorded on Lundy.

2017

Ringing movements between Lundy and north-west France

A first-year bird ringed at Donges, Loire-Atlantique, north-west France, in Aug 2015 was controlled on Lundy in Apr 2017 (see below for full details). This is the third Sedge Warbler to be ringed at the same French reedbed site in late summer and controlled on Lundy during a subsequent spring migration. Altogether, there have been six Lundy Sedge Warbler movements to or from the Loire-Atlantique, reflecting not only the importance of wetlands in this region for fattening-up prior to trans-Mediterranean and trans-Saharan flights in autumn, but also the intensive ringing effort there. Since 2002, thousands of Sedge Warblers have been ringed annually in Donges; over 10,000 individuals were handled in 2011 alone! These have generated numerous controls in other countries, the great majority in the UK.

2019

Notable spring-passage count

9 May – A count of 31 was one of the higher spring-passage day-totals of recent years (see May 2012 above).

2020

Early spring record

9 Apr – One singing from the 'Secret Garden', lower Millcombe, was the equal earliest since publication of The Birds of Lundy (the earliest ever was one on 7 Apr 1940).

Notable autumn-passage count

6 Aug – A count of 29 was one of the higher spring-passage day-totals of recent years (see Aug 2009 above).

2021

Early spring record

9 Apr – One in Millcombe was the equal earliest since publication of The Birds of Lundy (the earliest ever was one on 7 Apr 1940).

2022

Notable spring-passage count

30 Apr – A count of 30 was one of the higher spring-passage day-totals of recent years (see May 2012 above).

2023

Notable spring-passage count

First week of May – A count of 33 was one of the higher spring-passage day-totals of recent years (see May 2012 above).

 

Ringing:

The first two ringing movements detailed below refer to the Spanish- and French-ringed individuals mentioned at the foot of the table on p.198 of The Birds of Lundy.

Ringing control: A Sedge Warbler ringed as an adult at Coria del Rio, Sevilla, Andalucia, Spain (37°17’N, 6°03’E) on 25 Apr 2007 (ring no. Madrid N364976) was controlled on Lundy on 2 May 2007 (7 days; 1,547 km; N 5°). This shows rapid movement north during spring migration; from southernmost Spain to Lundy in exactly a week. This is the third movement shown by ringing of a Lundy Sedge Warbler to or from Spain.

Ringing control: A Sedge Warbler ringed as a first-year bird at Tour aux Moutons, Donges, Loire-Atlantique, France (47°19’N, 2°04’W) on 13 Aug 2006 (ring no. Paris 5337496) was controlled on Lundy on 3 May 2007 (263 days; 468 km; NNW 337°). This is the fifth first-year Sedge Warbler to have been ringed in France in autumn and controlled on Lundy during a subsequent spring migration.

Ringing control: A Sedge Warbler ringed as an adult on Lundy on 22 Apr 2006 (ring no. T930767) was controlled at Laguna de la Nava, Palencia, Castilla y Leon, Spain (42°05’N, 4°45’W) on 6 Apr 2008 (715 days; 1,010 km; S 181°). This is the fourth movement shown by ringing of a Lundy Sedge Warbler to or from Spain and the second involving Laguna de la Nava, which is designated as a Ramsar site (wetland of international importance) and as an EU Special Protection Area.

Ringing control: A Sedge Warbler ringed as an adult on 14 Aug 2008 (ring no. Paris 6034085) at Tour aux Moutons, Donges, Loire-Atlantique, France (47°19’N, 2°04’W) was controlled on Lundy on 20 Apr 2009 (249 days; 468 km; NNW 337°). This is the second adult Sedge Warbler to have been ringed in France in autumn and controlled on Lundy during a subsequent spring migration and shows an almost identical movement to the first-year bird ringed at the same location in Aug 2006 (see above).

Ringing control: A Sedge Warbler ringed as an adult on 29 Jul 2010 (ring no. Paris 6354503) at the reedbed of Chenac-Saint-Seurin-d'Uzet, Charente-Maritime, France was controlled on Lundy on 28 Apr 2011 (273 days; 691 km; NNW 336°).

Ringing control: A Sedge Warbler ringed as a first-year bird at Noyant, Soulaire-et-Bourg, Maine-et-Loire, France on 9 Aug 2008 (ring no. Paris 6040074) was controlled on Lundy on 25 Apr 2014 (2,085 days; 501 km; NW 324°).

Ringing control: A Sedge Warbler ringed as a first-year bird on Lundy on 30 Aug 2014 (ring no. D184287) was controlled at Terril de Pinchonvalles, Avion, Pas de Calais, France on 11 Sep 2014 (12 days; 533 km; E 100º).

Ringing control: A Sedge Warbler ringed as a first-year bird at Squire’s Down, Stalbridge, Dorset on 1 Sep 2016 (ring no. D995351) was controlled on Lundy on 1 May 2017. (242 days; 163 km; W 278°).

Ringing control: A Sedge Warbler ringed as an adult on Lundy on 20 Apr 2017 (ring no. Z981823) was controlled at Hasfield Ham, Gloucestershire on 22 Apr 2017 (2 days; 188 km; ENE 63°).

Ringing control: A Sedge Warbler ringed as a first-year bird at Tour aux Moutons, Donges, Loire-Atlantique, France (47°19’N, 2°04’W) on 18 Aug 2015 (ring no. Paris 7502526) was controlled on Lundy on 20 Apr 2017 (611 days; 468 km; NNW 337°).

Ringing control: A Sedge Warbler ringed as an adult female at Le Bonhomme, St-Philbert-de-Grand-Lieu, Loire-Atlantique, France (47°02'N 1°38'W) on 05 Aug 2015 (ring no. Paris 7447202) was controlled on Lundy, 30.4.19 (1,364 days; 505 km; NNW 335°).

Ringing control: A Sedge Warbler ringed as a first-year bird at South Milton Ley, Devon on 09 Aug 2018 (ring no. ADB7438) was controlled on Lundy on 07 May 2019 (271 days; 116 km; NNW 331°).

Ringing control: A Sedge Warbler ringed as a first-year bird at Tour aux Moutons, Donges, Loire-Atlantique, France (47°19’N, 2°04’W) on 15 Sep 2018 (ring no. Paris 8372245) was controlled on Lundy on 07 May 2019 (234 days; 468 km; NNW 337°).

Ringing control: A Sedge Warbler ringed as a first-year bird at Lough Beg, Ringaskiddy, Co. Cork, Ireland on 03 Sep 2018 (ring no. S730803) was controlled on Lundy on 10 May 2019 (249 days; 263 km; ESE 106°).

Ringing control: A Sedge Warbler ringed as a first-year bird at Mars-Ouest, Saint-Philbert-de-Grand-Lieu, Loire-Atlantique, France (47°02'N 1°38'W) on 06 Aug 2018 (ring no. Paris 8298291) was controlled on Lundy on 14 May 2019 (281 days; 500 km; NNW 335°).

Ringing control: A Sedge Warbler ringed as a first-year bird at Sandouville, Seine-Maritime, France (49°29′N 0°19'E) on 30 Aug 2018 (ring no. Paris 8752046) was controlled on Lundy 07 May 2019 (250 days; 400 km; WNW 298°).

Ringing control: A Sedge Warbler ringed as an adult female at Blackditch, Wicklow, Ireland on 17 Jul 2016 (ring no. Z246781) was controlled on Lundy on 08 May 2020 (1,391 days; 232 km; SSE 156°).

Ringing control: A Sedge Warbler ringed as an adult on Lundy on 26 Apr 2020 (ring no. ABH2037) was controlled at Tour aux Moutons, Donges, Loire-Atlantique, France on 03 Aug 2020 (99 days; 468 km; SSE 157°).

Ringing control: A Sedge Warbler ringed as an adult at Bahine, Guerande, Loire-Atlantique, France on 02 Aug 2019 (ring no. Paris 8702105) was controlled on Lundy on 08 May 2022 (1,010 days; 460 km; NNW 340°).

Paddyfield Warbler

Acrocephalus agricola

(no entry in The Birds of Lundy)

Species added to the Lundy List since Birds of Lundy was published in 2007

British vagrant. Breeds eastern Europe, Russia, Central Asia and China; winters South Asia. 83 British records to the end of 2011. Not previously recorded on Lundy or in Devon.

All new records

2008

First for Lundy

29 Oct – One was watched at close range along the East Side, just north of St Helen's Combe (J. Smith, A. Jayne, R.A. Duncan, T. Palmer, R.J. Taylor). An excellent set of photographs and video clips was taken and the bird was trapped and ringed, when it was aged as an adult. Record accepted by BBRC, constituting the first for Lundy and Devon.

Paddyfield Warbler, 29 Oct 2008
© John Smith

Blyth’s Reed Warbler

Acrocephalus dumetorum

(no entry in The Birds of Lundy)

Species added to the Lundy List since The Birds of Lundy was published in 2007

British vagrant. Breeds from eastern Europe, eastward across Russia and Central Asia; winters in South Asia. 129 British records to the end of 2011.

All new records

 2013

First for Lundy

3 Oct – One, mist-netted in Millcombe, was ringed and photographed (John Haddaway & John Horton). This is the first record of this species for Lundy and Devon and came hot-on-the-heels of another long-anticipated Lundy ‘first’, Booted Warbler, caught by the same ringing team two days previously. The breeding range of Blyth’s Reed Warbler is expanding westwards and this, together with improved identification criteria and observer awareness, has led to a large increase in the number and frequency of British records in recent years. Record accepted by BBRC.

Blyth's Reed Warbler trapped in Millcombe, 3 Oct 2013
© John Horton

2016

New record

25 Oct – One trapped and ringed in Millcombe (Rob Duncan, Justin Zantboer et al.); Record accepted by DBRC; only the second for Lundy.

Blyths Reed Warbler 25Oct2016 Justin ZantboerBlyth's Reed Warbler trapped in Millcombe, 25 Oct 2016
© Justin Zantboer

Reed Warbler

Acrocephalus scirpaceus

[Eurasian Reed Warbler] (p.199)

Selected new records

 

Earliest and latest since 2006 (last year covered in full by The Birds of Lundy): Earliest 17 Apr 2014 & 2015 (singles); Latest 25 Oct 2014 (one).

All records since 2006, during both spring and autumn passage, have been of one to three birds only. There have been several records of singing birds in spring, but there is no suitable breeding habitat on the island.

2010

Early start to autumn migration

15 Jul – One; the first July record for the island.

As of mid-2020, this remains the only occurrence in July.

2014

Early spring record

17 Apr – One trapped in St John's Valley remains the equal earliest ever recorded on the island.

Late autumn record

25 Oct – A skulking individual was feeding in ivy overhanging the cliffs at the mouth of St Helen's Combe. This remains the latest record since publication of The Birds of Lundy, though the latest ever was on 4 Nov 1982.

2015

Early spring record

17 Apr – One near Government House remains the equal earliest ever recorded on the island.

 

Reed Warbler Lundy 08Jun2016 Tim JonesReed Warbler, Quarters, 8 Jun 2016 © Tim Jones

2021

New record count for spring passage

30 May – Five on this date (two singing in Millcombe, one at St Helen's Copse and two along the Terrace) was the highest spring-passage count ever recorded for the island.

2023

New record count for autumn passage

21 Sep – Four on this date (all trapped and ringed) was the highest autumn-passage count ever recorded for the island.

 

Ringing

Ringing control: A Reed Warbler ringed as a first-year bird at Gunwalloe, Cornwall on 22 Aug 2012 (ring no.Y752659) was controlled on Lundy on 17 Apr 2014 (603 days; 133 km; NNE 19°).

Ringing control: A Reed Warbler ringed as an adult at Porth Hellick, St Mary’s, Isles of Scilly on 18 Apr 2017 (ring no. S327850) was controlled on Lundy on 20 & 22 Apr 2017 (2 and 4 days; 180 km; NE 40°).

Ringing control: A Reed Warbler ringed as a first-year bird at Blackers Rock, Lough Neagh, Co. Tyrone, Northern Ireland (54°35'N 6°33'W) on 13 Aug 2017 was controlled on Lundy on on 06 May 2019 (631 days; 404 km; SSE 162º). See also this webpage of the Causeway Coast Ringing Group.

Ringing control: A Reed Warbler ringed as an adult male at Nanjizal, Land's End, Cornwall on 8 Jul 2019 (ring no. AVH4186) was controlled on Lundy on 19 Apr 2020 (286 days; 144 km; NNE 31º).

Ringing control: A Reed Warbler ringed as a juvenile at Porth Hellick, St Mary’s, Isles of Scilly on 06 Jul 2019 (ring no. AVF4022) was controlled on Lundy on 19 Apr 2021 (653 days; 180 km; NE 40°).

Ringing control: A Reed Warbler ringed as a first-year bird at Porth Hellick, St Mary’s, Isles of Scilly on 11 Aug 2020 (ring no. AVF4870) was controlled on Lundy on 04 May 2022 (631 days; 180 km; NE 40°).

Ringing control: A Reed Warbler ringed as a first-year bird at Porth Hellick, St Mary’s, Isles of Scilly on 31 Aug 2020 (ring no. AVF4914) was controlled on Lundy on 07 May 2023(2 years, 8 months, 7 days; 180 km NE).

Marsh Warbler

Acrocephalus palustris

(p.198)

All new records

2014

New record

3 Jun – One singing from 'Smelly Gully', lower Millcombe (Richard & Rebecca Taylor, Tony & Ann Taylor). Record accepted by DBRC; only the fifth record for Lundy, the last being a singing male near Stoneycroft on 26 May 1997.

2020

New record

6 Sep – A first-winter bird  was watched and photographed at close range in St John's Valley (Tim Jones et al.).

Record accepted by DBRC; the sixth for the island.

Booted Warbler

Iduna caligata

(no entry in The Birds of Lundy)

Species added to the Lundy List since Birds of Lundy was published in 2007

British vagrant. Breeds across central Eurasia, especially Russia, migrating to winter mainly in South Asia. 128 British records to the end of 2011.

All new records

2013

First for Lundy

1 Oct – One, mist-netted in Millcombe, was ringed and photographed (John Haddaway & John Horton); a long overdue first occurrence of this species on Lundy. Record accepted by BBRC.

Booted Warbler trapped in Millcombe, 1 Oct 2013
© John Horton

2008

Report assessed as not proven

28 Sep – The submission for one in the rushes around Pondsbury was assessed by BBRC as ‘not proven’.

2022

Report assessed as not proven

29 Oct – The submission for a Booted or Sykes's Warbler (Iduna caligata or I. rama) along the Terrace was assessed by BBRC as 'not proven'.

Melodious Warbler

Hippolais polyglotta

(pp.200–201)

All new records

2010

New record

4 Sep – One seen on the Terrace (A.M. Taylor, R. Taylor). Record accepted by DBRC; the 31st year in which this species has been recorded, but the first since Aug 2005.

2012

New records

10 to 13 Sep – One first seen on the southern side of Millcombe, below Millcombe House, on 10 Sep was trapped and ringed on 13th (Richard Taylor, Tony Taylor).

20 & 21 Sep – A second bird, first seen in upper Millcombe, below Government House, on 20 Sep (Andy Jayne) was trapped and ringed on 21st and was seen again in Millcombe on 22nd (Chris Dee et al.). Records accepted by DBRC.

Melodious Warbler, Millcombe, 21 Sep 2012 © Andy Jayne

2018

New record

5 Oct – One was watched for about 10 minutes from the Terrace and Lower East Side Path (Tim Davis & Tim Jones). Initially perched on the willows near the Terrace Heligoland Trap, the bird worked its way along and up the sidelands towards Quarry Cottages, before diving back down towards the Terrace, where it could not be relocated. Record accepted by DBRC.

2020

New records

31 Jul – A first-year bird was mist-netted in Millcombe (on the slope up to the Ugly) mid-morning. It was not seen in the field, either before capture or after release (Dean Jones).

31 Aug – One was watched and photographed in willow scrub at the Terrace (Dean Jones).

Records accepted by DBRC.

2023

New records – subject to acceptance by DBRC

23 Aug – One was trapped and ringed in Millcombe (Luke Marriner & Joe Parker).

27 Aug – An unringed individual was photographed along the Lower East Side Path (Luke Marriner).

3 Sep – One was seen along the Terrace (Joe Parker).

Icterine Warbler

Hippolais icterina

(pp.199–200)

All new records

2008

New record

15 to 20 Sep – A first-winter bird was watched in bracken along the East Side on 15 & 16 Sep, then in Millcombe on 19th & 20th (A. Williams). Record accepted by DBRC – the first for Lundy since Sep 2005.

2013

New record

3 Sep – A first-winter bird was mist-netted in Millcombe (Richard & Rebecca Taylor, Tony Taylor). Record accepted by DBRC.

2019

New record

23 to 26 Aug – One in blackthorn scrub in upper Millcombe on 23rd (Dean Jones) was seen again in Millcombe on 25th, then trapped and ringed there on 26th (Rebecca & Richard Taylor, Tony Taylor). Record accepted by DBRC.

2020

New record

5 Sep – One was feeding actively in lower Millcombe (Richard Taylor et al.). Record accepted by DBRC.

2021

Unidentified Hippolais warbler

2 Jun – A Hippolais warbler seen briefly in Millcombe on 2 Jun was thought probably to be an Icterine Warbler, but views were inconclusive and the bird shot off up the valley, never to be seen again (Dean Jones). Record accepted by Devon Bird Recorder as 'unidentified Hippolais warbler'.

2023

New record – subject to acceptance by DBRC

27 & 28 Aug – One first seen and photographed as it fed in oaks on the north side of Millcombe at about 08:30 hrs on 27th was still present the following morning, when it was feeding in trees below Brambles (Joe Parker, Luke Marriner).

Grasshopper Warbler

Locustella naevia

[Common Grasshopper Warbler] (p.195)

Selected new records

 

Earliest and latest since 2006 (last year covered in full by The Birds of Lundy): Earliest 31 Mar 2021 (one); Latest 23 Oct 2007 (one trapped and ringed; see below).

2007

Record late date in autumn

23 Oct – One trapped and ringed remains (as of the end of 2023) the latest ever recorded on the island (the previous latest being one on 20 October 1969).

2009

Notable spring-passage count

27 Apr – A count of ten remains (as of the end of 2023) the highest day-total recorded in spring since The Birds of Lundy was published in 2007.

Notable autumn-passage counts

24 Aug & 20 Sep – Counts of four on both dates remain (as of the end of 2023) the highest day-total recorded in autumn since The Birds of Lundy was published in 2007.

2018

Late date in autumn

18 Oct – One flushed at the western end of Quarter Wall (Andy Jayne) is among the latest-ever records for the island.

2019

Notable spring-passage count

21 Apr – A count of six is the highest day-total recorded in spring since 2009 (see above).

2020

Early spring record

9 Apr – One reeling in St John's Valley, equalled the (then) earliest-ever date for the island of 9 Apr 1981 & 1990.

2021

Record early date in spring

31 Mar – One reeling from thick scrub below The Ugly at 10:30 hrs remains (as of the end of 2023) the earliest ever recorded on Lundy.

Blackcap

Sylvia atricapilla

[Eurasian Blackcap] (pp.201–204)

Selected new records

Earliest and latest since 2006 (last year covered in full by The Birds of Lundy): Earliest 14 Mar 2012 (one); Latest 30 Nov 2020 (one). Excludes presumed wintering birds recorded in Dec 2007 and Jan 2008, mid-Dec 2013, and 20-22 Dec 2021.

 

Correction p.203 table (a): the 1st-year bird ringed on Lundy on 20 October 1988 and found in Switzerland in May 1990 was a female, not a male as stated. The original BTO recovery form showed male, but a correction was issued subsequently (Tony Taylor, personal communication).

2007

Winter record

22 to 27 Dec – A male was seen daily outside Quarters/Pig's Paradise, photographed feeding on a fat-ball on 26 Dec (see photo by Stuart Leavy posted on www.lundybirds.org.uk).

2008

Winter record

1 Jan – Presumably the same bird as that seen in December was again seen outside the staff accommodation at Quarters/Pig's Paradise.

2011

Notable autumn-passage count

4 Oct – A major fall of an estimated 300 Blackcaps (together with 300 Chiffchaffs and 100 Goldcrests) occurred on the morning of 4 Oct, the main concentrations being in Millcombe, St Helen’s Copse and along the Terrace, with smaller numbers in all parts of the island that were visited by observers. Seventy were ringed using a small number of mist-nets in Millcombe. At the time, the total of 300 represented a record for Lundy during either spring or autumn passage, but that number has since been eclipsed in both spring (2012) and autumn (2023). Most of the birds involved in the fall of 2011 were gone by the next day, when only 40 were seen.

2012

Unprecedented spring fall

26 Apr to 8 May – An unprecedented fall of at least 3,000 occurred on 26 Apr, with 500 on 27th and 200 the following day. Unusually high numbers continued into the first week of May, with counts of 150, 450, 450 and 250 for 1st-4th, but only small numbers after 8th. Unfortunately, the mass grounding on 26 Apr and the other high counts during this period were associated with a prolonged spell of cold, unsettled weather, with frequent strong winds and heavy rain that clearly disrupted normal migration patterns. Some 147 Blackcaps were ringed on 26 Apr alone, contributing to a record annual total of 721 for this species.

Circumstantial evidence of breeding

On 29 May a singing male was heard in Millcombe and a female with a brood patch was trapped and ringed. Alarm calls were also heard (Tony & Ann Taylor). One was singing at Quarter Wall Copse on 31 May. Efforts to prove breeding during June (19th-21st) proved fruitless, short bursts of song in Millcombe being the only evidence of the species’ continued presence (Tim Davis & Tim Jones). Successful breeding by Blackcaps on Lundy therefore remains to be proven, though further strong circumstantial evidence came in the form of a male, originally ringed in Millcombe in May, being retrapped in active wing moult on 31 Aug (David Price et al.). This individual had almost certainly summered on the island and it seems probable that a breeding attempt was made, given the presence of a female with a brood patch.

2013

Notable autumn-passage count

5 Oct – A fall of 300+ (of which 75 ringed), coincided with a major arrival of Goldcrests, Chiffchaffs and other migrants. This equals the number estimated on 4 Oct 2011 and 14 Sep 2017 but was exceeded on 21 Sep 2023 (see below).

Winter record

16 Dec – One. This is only the second winter record since publication of The Birds of Lundy (the other being 22 Dec 2007 to 1 Jan 2008).

Breeding season

There were no records in Jun or Jul.

2014

Circumstantial evidence of breeding

May to Jul – There was circumstantial evidence of a nesting attempt in Millcombe, where a single singing male was seen and heard regularly around the slope below Brambles in late May and early Jun, and a female seen occasionally in the same area on 9 & 10 Jun. The male was singing only briefly and intermittently, which together with the infrequent appearance of the female, was strongly suggestive of a pair with a nest and eggs. A female was seen in the same area on 6 Jul.

25 Sep – A significant fall grounded 250 autumn migrants (Chris Dee et al.)

2015

Notable spring-passage count

16 Apr – There was an influx of at least 200 Blackcaps, which Paul Holt and Tony John described as being "all over the place".

Circumstantial evidence of breeding

4 to 16 Jun – There were again some intriguing records in Jun, hinting at a possible breeding attempt in Millcombe, with a male on 4 & 5 Jun, a female on 8 Jun and a male sub-singing in the same area on 15 & 16 Jun. However, a small arrival of three strongly singing males on 14 Jun (Millcombe, Quarter Wall Copse and Terrace) for one day only showed that a trickle of migration was continuing. There were no records after 16 Jun until one on 10 Aug.

2016

Successful breeding confirmed for the first time

Jun & Jul – On 11 Jun, a pair (both carrying rings) were gathering spiders’ webs as nesting material from the ‘Secret Garden’ area of Millcombe and flying to their presumed nest site on the slope below Brambles
East. The male was singing in short, intense bursts, ‘wing shivering’ and thought also to be courtship feeding the female (Tim Davis & Tim Jones). A male was singing daily in Millcombe from 21–28 Jun (David Price), whilst a male carrying food and alarming, plus two juveniles, were in Millcombe during 28–30 Jul (Chris Baillie). These observations constitute the first-ever record of successful breeding on Lundy.

2017

Highest ever autumn-passage count equalled

14 Sep – An estimated 300 were present on the island (with 200 the following day), equalling the autumn-passage record set on 4 Oct 2011 and matched on 5 Oct 2013.

Breeding season

May to Jul – Although song was heard in Millcombe on 22 & 23 May, the only occurrence in Jun was of one on 3rd and there were no sightings at all in Jul, meaning that there was no repeat of the successful breeding recorded in 2016.

2018

Breeding confirmed – second record for Lundy

Jun/Jul – A pair (including a singing male) was present in Millcombe during the first week of Jun and fledglings were being fed by a female in the 'Secret Garden' area of lower Millcombe on 17 Jul (Dean Jones).

2019

Notable spring-passage count

20 Apr – A count of 300 was one of the higher spring-passage day-totals of recent years, but well short of the 'mega fall' of Apr 2012 (see above for details).

Breeding confirmed – third record for Lundy

Jun – A female collecting food in lower Millcombe on 15th indicated a breeding attempt and successful breeding was confirmed when two fledglings were seen with an adult female below Brambles on 29th.

2020

Breeding confirmed – fourth record for Lundy

Fledglings were seen in Millcombe on 24 Jun and another brood was being fed there on 9 Jul. A breeding attempt was made at Quarter Wall Copse (the first evidence of breeding away from Millcombe) but the outcome is unknown.

Late autumn record

30 Nov – One on this date is the latest since publication of The Birds of Lundy (excluding three winter records for mid- to late-Dec or Jan).

2021

Record annual ringing total

The total of 1,148 Blackcaps ringed established a new annual record for the island.

Notable spring-passage count

31 Mar – The total of 144 on this date set a new record for the highest-ever March count for the island.

Breeding confirmed – fifth record for Lundy

A fledgling was being fed in Millcombe on 1 Jul; the fourth consecutive year, and fifth year overall in which Blackcaps have been confirmed as breeding successfully.

Winter record

20 & 22 Dec – A male on feeders at Paradise Row was only the third record for Dec or Jan since publication of The Birds of Lundy.

2022

No evidence of successful breeding

A female was nest-building in Millcombe on 20 May. A male held territory at Quarter Wall Copse, but there was no evidence of successful breeding there.

2023

Highest ever autumn-passage count

21 Sep – An exceptional fall of 350+ occurred, making it the largest autumn-passage day-total ever for Lundy. No fewer than 161 were ringed during the day.

High annual ringing total

The total of 1,004 Blackcaps ringed during the year was the second-highest number on record (second only to 2021).

 

Ringing:

Ringing recovery: A Blackcap ringed as a second-year female ringed on Lundy on 10 May 2004 (ring no. R873165) was found dead (having hit a window) in Antrim, County Antrim, Northern Ireland, on 19 May 2007 (1,104 days; 411 km; NNW 346°). This is the second Lundy-ringed Blackcap to have been found on the island of Ireland and is likely to have been in its breeding area. The first instance involved a bird found in Co. Cork in the Irish Republic in June 1996.

Ringing control: A Blackcap ringed as a full-grown female ringed on 06 Nov 2007 (Spanish ring no. N678134) at Junta de los Rios, San Roque, Cadiz, Andalucia, Spain (36° 14’N 5° 22’W) was controlled on Lundy on 25 Apr 2008 (171 days; 1,661 km; N 2°). This is the second ringing movement of a Blackcap involving Lundy and Spain.

Ringing control: A Blackcap ringed as a first-year female on 16 Sep 2008 (German ring no. 90011969) on Helgoland, Germany (54° 10’N 7° 55’E) was controlled on Lundy on 01 Sep 2008 (15 days; 911 km; WSW 249°). This is the second ringing movement of a Blackcap involving Lundy and Germany, but the first showing such rapid, long-distance movement south-west in autumn.

Ringing control: A Blackcap ringed as a second-year male on 21 Apr 2008 (ring no. V798210) at Braunton, Devon, was controlled on Lundy on 18 Apr 2009 during spring migration a year later (362 days; 37 km; WNW 282°).

Ringing control: A Blackcap ringed as a full-grown male on 07 Sep 2009 (Belgian ring no. 11305869) at Rijkevorsel, Antwerp, Belgium (51° 21’N 4° 46’E) was controlled on Lundy on 14 Oct 2009 (37 days; 657 km; W 269°). This is the sixth ringing movement of a Blackcap involving Lundy and Belgium.

Ringing recovery: A Blackcap ringed as a first-year female on Lundy on 16 Oct 2010 (ring no. L556016) was found freshly dead at, Boliqueime, Loulé, Algarve, Portugal (37° 09’N 8° 08’W) on 08 Nov 2010 (21 days; 1,582 km; S 190°). This is the first Blackcap movement involving Lundy and Portugal. The bird could already have been in its wintering area; equally, it may still have been heading further south when it died.

Ringing control: A Blackcap ringed as an adult female on Lundy on 28 Apr 2010 (ring no. L037253) was controlled on 16 Jun 2011 at Cors Ddyga, Llangefni, Anglesey, where it seems likely to have been in its breeding area (414 days; 229 km; N 6°).

Ringing control: A Blackcap ringed as an adult female at Nanjizal, Land's End, Cornwall on 28 Apr 2012 (ring no. Y101842) was controlled on Lundy on 02 May 2012 (4 days; 144 km; NNE 31°).

Ringing control: A Blackcap ringed as a first-year female at Longham Lakes, Dorset on 09 Sep 2011 (ring no. L902631) was controlled on Lundy on 03 May 2012 (237 days; 198 km; WNW 284°).

Ringing control: A Blackcap ringed as a first-year male at Finca Castillejos, Guadalajara, Castilla-La Mancha, Spain on 16 Oct 2011 (ring no. 1L27285) was controlled on Lundy on 28 Sep 2012 (348 days; 1,180 km; N 354°). This is the third ringing movement of a Blackcap involving Lundy and Spain.

Ringing control: A Blackcap ringed as a first-year male at Icklesham, Suffolk on 05 Oct 2013 (ring no. D354936) was controlled on Lundy on 05 Sep 2014 (335 days; 374 km; W 275°).

Ringing control: A Blackcap ringed as a first-year female at Nanjizal, Land's End, Cornwall on 27 Sep 2014 (ring no. Z350310) was controlled on Lundy on 28 Sep 2014 (1 days; 144 km; NNE 31°).

Ringing control: A Blackcap ringed as a first-year female on Lundy on 03 Oct 2015 (ring no. Z420822) was controlled on Hilbre Island, Wirral, Merseyside, on 04 May 2016 (214 days; 264 km; NNE 22°).

Ringing control: A Blackcap ringed as a first-year female at Beachy Head, East Sussex on 22 Sep 2018 (ring no. AYD2111) was controlled on Lundy on 05 May 2019 (225 days; 348 km; W 278°).

Ringing recovery: A Blackcap ringed as a first-year female on Lundy on 13 Sep 2018 (ring no. ABB7781) was found dead (hit wires; not fresh) at Socuéllamos, Ciudad Real, Castilla-La Mancha, Spain on 22 Nov 2019 (435 days; 1,329 km; S 174°). This is the fourth ringing movement of a Blackcap involving Lundy and Spain.

Ringing control: A Blackcap ringed as a first-year female on 29 Sep 2020 (ring no. APN2214) at Middle Hill, Gibraltar (36° 13’N 5° 33’W) was controlled on Lundy on 16 & 17 Apr 2021 (199 & 200 days; 1,670 km; N 2°).

Ringing control: A Blackcap ringed as a first-year female on Lundy on 11 Oct 2021 (ring no. ANL4786) was controlled at Denwick, Deerness, Orkney on 31 Oct 2021 (20 days; 874 km; N 9°).

Ringing control: A Blackcap ringed as a first-year male at Blavand Fugelstation, Blavand, Ribe, Denmark on 07 Oct 2020 (Copenhagen ring no. CX37116) was controlled on Lundy on 14 Apr 2022 (554 days; 975 km; WSW 241°).

Ringing control: A Blackcap ringed as a second-year female on Lundy on 02 May 2022 (ring no. AHX2038) was controlled at Challacombe, Postbridge, Devon, on 09 Jul 2022 (68 days; 86 km; SE 138°).

Ringing control: A Blackcap ringed as a first-year female on Skokholm, Pembrokeshire on 29 Sep 2022 (ring no. ACY7614) was controlled on Lundy on 17 Apr 2023 (6 months, 19 days; 73.5 km SE).

Ringing control: A Blackcap ringed as a first-year male at Isle of Grain Power Station, Medway, Kent on 05 Sep 2022 (ring no. APT9260) was controlled on Lundy on 22 Sep 2023 (1 year, 17 days; 374.5 km W).

Ringing control: A Blackcap ringed as a first-year female on Lundy on 21 Sep 2023 (ring no. BNA0555) was controlled at Longis Bay, Alderney, Channel Islands on 23 Sep 2023 (2 days; 240 km SE).

Garden Warbler

Sylvia borin

(p.204)

Selected new records

 

Earliest and latest since 2006 (last year covered in full by The Birds of Lundy): Earliest 7 Apr 2007 (one); Latest 4 Nov 2011 (one) and 4 Nov 2020 (one).

2008

Notable spring-passage count

2 May – Twenty, coinciding with a significant of other warblers, remains (as of the end of 2023) the highest spring count since publication of The Birds of Lundy. The highest ever was 50 on 1 May 1999.

Notable autumn-passage count

17 Oct – A count of five remains (as of the end of 2023) the highest autumn count since publication of The Birds of Lundy. The highest ever was 30 on both 23 Sep 1965 & 22 Sep 1982.

2017

Notable spring-passage count

30 Apr – A count of seven was one of the higher spring day-totals of recent years.

Notable autumn-passage count

10 Sep – A count of four was one of the higher autumn day-totals of recent years.

2022

Notable autumn-passage count

14 Sep – A count of four was one of the higher autumn day-totals of recent years.

 

Ringing:

Ringing control: A Garden Warbler ringed as a first-year bird on 09 Sep 2009 (ring no. X883597) at Snettisham, on the Norfolk coast of The Wash, was controlled in Millcombe on 18 Sep 2009 (9 days; 397 km; WSW 242°). This is only the second Garden Warbler ringing movement involving Lundy; the first, in Sep 1981, showed a remarkably similar trajectory from Gibraltar Point Bird Observatory, on the Lincolnshire shore of The Wash.

Barred Warbler

Sylvia nisoria

(pp.204–205)

All new records

 

Clarification At least 25 different individuals occurred during the period 1947 to 2006 (first record in this period 1949, last in 2005).

2007

New record

12 Sep – A first-winter bird trapped in St John's Valley (D. Kightley, A. Plant, A.M. Taylor et al.) was the 11th Barred Warbler to be ringed on the island and constituted the fifth Lundy occurrence since 2000. Record accepted by DBRC.

Barred-Warbler-12-Sep-2007-Adrian-PlantBarred Warbler, Millcombe, 12 Sep 2007
© Adrian Plant

2014

New record

2 Oct – One was seen briefly on the Terrace (Richard Campey). Record accepted by DBRC.

2017

New record

15 Oct – A first-winter bird was in Millcombe (Chris & Carol Baillie, Richard Campey et al.). Record accepted by DBRC.

2019

New records

10 Sep – A first-winter bird seen briefly in Millcombe on 10 Sep (Nik Ward).

17 Oct – Another first-winter bird feeding in willow and blackberry scrub by the Terrace Trap (James Diamond et al.).

Records accepted by DBRC.

2021

New record

14 Nov – One spent the day feeding in the walled gardens of Millcombe, often out in the open and becoming more confiding as the day went on (Eleanor Grover). This constitutes the latest ever record for Lundy. 

Record accepted by DBRC.

2023

New records – subject to acceptance by DBRC

17 Sep – A first-winter bird was trapped (in the mist-net set on the slope up to the Ugly) and ringed in Millcombe (Anna Sutcliffe et al.).

29 Sep – A first-winter bird was first seen in Upper Millcombe  at 08:10 hrs and shortly afterwards along the start of the Upper East Side Path before diving down into St Helen's Combe and being lost from view at 08:40 hrs (Tim Jones et al.).

Lesser Whitethroat

Sylvia curruca

(pp.205–206)

Selected new records

 

Earliest and latest since 2006 (last year covered in full by The Birds of Lundy): Earliest 17 Apr 2011 (one); Latest 4 Nov 2020 (one).

2007

Late bird in autumn

2 Nov – One in Millcombe.

2009

Late bird in autumn

3 Nov – One a little later still.

2010

Singing male – presumed passage migrant

2 & 3 Jun – A singing male along the East Side was presumably a late migrant as there was no further evidence of territory holding (Lesser Whitethroats were confirmed as having bred successfully in 2002).

2011

Highest count of recent years

4 May – A count of five remains (as of the end of 2023) the highest number logged since publication of The Birds of Lundy. The highest spring count ever was ten, 11-13 May 1996, whilst the highest autumn count ever was four on 16 Sep 1988.

2012

Notable day-count

2 May – Three on this date is the only other instance in recent years (apart from May 2011 – see above), of more than one or two being logged in a day during either spring or autumn migration.

2014

Potential 'Siberian' Lesser Whitethroat

30 Oct – One trapped and ringed in Millcombe (Rob Duncan et al.) showed characters of ‘Siberian' Lesser Whitethroat S. c. blythi  based on wing formula and pattern of white in the tail feathers. However, feather samples were not sent for DNA analysis.

2020

Late bird in autumn

4 Nov – One photographed at Quarter Wall Pond (Andy Jayne) was one of the latest recorded on Lundy in autumn (the latest ever being 19 Nov 1954).

2021

Potential eastern race bird

11-14 Oct – One in Millcombe was trapped and ringed on 11th. It was considered likely to belong to one of the eastern races and shed body feathers were retained for DNA analysis.

 

Ringing

Ringing control: A Lesser Whitethroat ringed as a first-year bird at Kilpaison Marsh, Rhoscrowther, Pembrokeshire on 30 Aug 2018 (ring no. AAC9100) was controlled on Lundy on 23 Apr 2019 (236 days; 62 km; SSE 155º).

This is the first ringing movement of a Lesser Whitethroat involving Lundy.

Whitethroat

Sylvia communis

[Common Whitethroat] (pp.206–207)

Selected new records

Earliest and latest since 2006 (last year covered in full by The Birds of Lundy): Earliest 10 Apr 2010 (two); Latest 3 Nov 2020 (one).

 

Whitethroat in Millcombe, 25 Apr 2014
© Richard Campey

2009

Breeding season

Up to two were recorded sporadically in May, Jun & Jul; song was reported from 2-4 Jun and a juvenile was seen in Millcombe on 17 Jul, suggesting that breeding may have occurred on the island.

2010

Breeding season

Jun – A singing male appeared to be holding territory on the Terrace in the first week of Jun but there was no evidence of breeding.

2011

Breeding season

13 & 30 Jun – Six were along the East Side on 13th, suggesting that territory-holding birds may have been present, and a singing male was heard along the Lower East Side Path on 30 Jun, but there was no other evidence of breeding.

Notable autumn-passage count

22 Aug – A count of 15 was one of the higher autumn-passage totals since publication of The Birds of Lundy in 2007.

2012

Notable spring-passage counts

3 & 4 May – Counts of 50 on both dates remain the highest since The Birds of Lundy was published.

2013

Breeding season

No evidence of breeding.

Notable autumn-passage count

6 Sep – A count of 15 was one of the higher autumn-passage totals since publication of The Birds of Lundy in 2007.

2014

Breeding season

May & Jun – A female was seen in Millcombe in late May and single territory-holding males were singing in Millcombe and St Helen's Copse during the period 7–12 Jun, but there was no conclusive evidence of breeding. One singing on the Terrace on 7 Jun was presumably a late migrant as it was not heard subsequently.

2015

Breeding season

No evidence of breeding, though small numbers of migrants occurred during May and up to 14 Jun.

2016

Breeding season

10 & 11 Jun – A male was singing and carrying nesting material (sometimes simultaneously!) in St Helen’s Copse, but there was no sign of a second bird.

2018

Breeding season

Jun & Jul – There were scattered records of single birds in Jun, including a territory-holding but apparently unpaired male, up to the end of Jun and into early Jul, but there was no other evidence of a breeding attempt.

2019

Notable spring-passage count

9 May – A count of 45 was one of the higher spring-passage day-totals of recent years.

Confirmed breeding

Successful breeding was confirmed on 29 Jun when a pair in upper Millcombe were seen feeding at least two chicks – the first confirmation of breeding on the island since 1978 (David Lindo). A second brood of at least three chicks was in the same area on 27 Jul (Dean Jones).

2020

Confirmed breeding

Singing males were holding territory in Jun (four singing on 4th) and Jul and a pair bred successfully on the sidelands above White Beach, feeding nestlings there on 16 Jun, with a further recently-fledged brood being fed on the sidings just south of Kaaksburg Bay on 24 Jul (Dean Jones).

Exceptionally late autumn record

3 Nov – One in Millcombe (Andy Jayne, Dean Jones) was the second latest ever recorded for Lundy  (the latest on record was one on 5 Nov 1959).

2021

Confirmed breeding

A pair was feeding fledglings near the ‘Steps of Doom’ on 24 Jun – the third consecutive year of successful breeding on the island.

Notable autumn-passage count

7 Sep – A count of 16 was one of the higher autumn-passage totals since publication of The Birds of Lundy in 2007.

2022

Confirmed breeding

There were five territorial males in May: three in Millcombe, one on the Terrace and another at Quarter Wall Copse. Two young were seen by the Ugly and four below Millcombe House in Jun, proving that at least two pairs bred successfully.

Notable autumn-passage count

14 Sep – A count of 30 remains (as of the end of 2023) the highest autumn-passage total since publication of The Birds of Lundy in 2007.

2023

Confirmed breeding

A pair was carrying food to a nest site on Lametor (just north of the South Light compound) on 21 Jun.

Notable autumn-passage count

14 Sep – A count of 26 was the second-highest autumn-passage total since publication of The Birds of Lundy in 2007.

Late autumn record

22 Oct – One; among the later occurrences of recent years.

 

Ringing

Ringing control: A Whitethroat ringed as an adult female on Lundy on 07 May 2008 (ring no. X226113) was controlled at Land’s End, Cornwall on 10 May 2008 (3 days; 143 km; SSW 212°).

Ringing control: A Whitethroat ringed as a full-grown male on Calf of Man, Isle of Man on 28 Apr 2023 (ring no. AJT7196) was controlled on Lundy on 13 Sep 2023 (4 months, 16 Days; 321 km S).

Dartford Warbler

Sylvia undata

(pp.207–208)

All new records

2008

New record

22 Apr – A male seen in St John's Valley constitutes the 7th record for Lundy (the last was in October 2005) and the 3rd in spring (the others were in March 1963 and April 1988).

2015

New record

16 Oct – A male, thought probably a first-winter bird, was watched at close range as it worked its way slowly east through scattered gorse bushes near Quarter Wall gate (James Diamond et al.). It was found when visiting birdwatchers were scouring the island looking for the Great Grey Shrike that had been seen briefly that morning. This is the 8th record for Lundy, five of which have been in autumn.

2017

New record

2 Nov – A male near Brambles on 2 Nov (Paul Holt) was the 9th record for Lundy, six of which have now been in autumn.

2020

New records

10 Sep – One was in gorse, heather and bracken scrub about 200m SSW of Pondsbury during the early afternoon (Tim Jones et al.).

20 Sep – One was seen briefly in gorse near the Rocket Pole (Richard Campey).

There is no way of knowing for sure if these sightings refer to one or two individuals, though it seems likely that two birds were involved. These constitute the 10th & 11th records for the island.

2021

New records

17 Oct – One was calling from gorse clumps at the western end of Quarter Wall about 75m west of the Airfield at 12:15 hrs. It afforded brief flight views before dropping into bracken and appearing to move away south (James Diamond) – the 12th record for the island, of which five have been from 2015 onwards.

Eastern Subalpine Warbler & Western Subalpine Warbler

Curruca cantillans & C. iberiae

(p.209)

All new records

In December 2020 the official British List maintained by the BOU, and followed here, recognised Eastern Subalpine Warbler Curruca cantillans and Western Subalpine Warbler C. iberiae as separate species. All post-2006 Lundy records of subalpine warbler species are currently listed here, pending the outcome of a review in consultation with the Devon Bird Recorder/DBRC, following which all records will be assigned to separate accounts for Eastern Subalpine Warbler, Western Subalpine Warbler, or unidentified subalpine warbler sp.

2007

Update

11, 19 & 20 Apr – The record of a male in Millcombe (A. Jayne, J.W. Leonard et al.) was accepted by DBRC and constitutes the 13th record for Lundy. The sightings are presumed to refer to a single individual, though the possibility that two birds were involved cannot be entirely discounted.

2010

New record

9 Jun – A female, thought to be in its second calendar year, was watched and photographed in the clumps of gorse just west of the main track gate near Quarter Wall Pond on 9 Jun (D. Spittle). Record accepted by DBRC; the 14th occurrence for Lundy.

2011

New record

24 Apr – An apparently adult male of the western race S. c. cantillans was seen at Quarter Wall on 24 Apr (K. Rylands). Record accepted by DBRC; the 15th Lundy Record.

2012

New record

30 May to 2 Jun – Two second calendar-year males were mist-netted (one just outside Brambles, the other in the willow scrub in St John’s Valley) and ringed within a short time of each other during the morning of 30 May (Paul James, Rob Skeates et al.). One was later relocated in Millcombe, on the south side of The Ugly (Chris Baillie et al.) and in the same general area on 1 & 2 Jun (Grant & Michaela Cozens et al.). Records accepted by DBRC; the 16th & 17th records for Lundy.

Male Subalpine Warbler, Millcombe,
30 May 2012 © Paul James

2017

New record

13 May – A male Eastern Subalpine Warbler Sylvia cantillans was on the side of the Ugly near the top of the ‘Steps of Doom’ (Dean Jones). Record accepted as an unraced individual by BBRC. The 18th reecord for Lundy.

2019

New records

22 Apr – A second calendar-year male Eastern Subalpine Warbler of the race Sylvia c. cantillans was trapped and ringed in Millcombe (Rob Duncan, David Kightley, Dean Jones). Sub-specific identification confirmed by DNA analysis.

30 Apr – A second calendar-year female Eastern Subalpine Warbler of the race Sylvia c. albistriata was seen on the flanks of the Ugly near Millcombe House, then trapped and ringed in Millcombe walled gardens shortly afterwards. Sub-specific identification confirmed by DNA analysis (Rob Duncan, Tim Jones et al.).

1 & 5 May – A second calendar-year male Western Subalpine Warbler Sylvia inornata was trapped and ringed in Millcombe (Rob Duncan, David Kightley et al.). It was subsequently resighted in Millcombe on 5th. Initial identification confirmed by DNA analysis.

6 May – A second calendar-year male Eastern Subalpine Warbler of the race Sylvia c. albistriata was seen feeding in sycamores below Brambles, then trapped and ringed in Millcombe walled gardens shortly afterwards (Rob Duncan, Tim Jones, David Kightley et al.). Initial identification confirmed by DNA analysis.

11 May – A second calendar-year female Eastern Subalpine Warbler of the race Sylvia c. albistriata was trapped and ringed in Millcombe (Rob Duncan, Dean Jones, David Kightley). Sub-specific identification confirmed by DNA analysis.

The unprecented occurrence of five individuals within three weeks comprises the 19th to 23rd records for Lundy, or nearly one-quarter all the Subalpine Warblers ever recorded on the island! Records accepted by BBRC.

2021

New records

15 May – A male subalpine warbler sp. (thought likely to be Eastern) was seen briefly in Millcombe, near the gas store, during the early morning. In spite of thorough searching, it couldn't be relocated (Tim Jones).

9 to 11 Jun – An elusive, non-calling, male subalpine warbler sp. (thought to be Western or Moltoni's) was found in Millcombe on 9th (Steve Richards). It was still present on 11th (Rebecca & Richard Taylor).

Records accepted by BBRC.

2022

New record

26 Apr – A male, thought to be Eastern Subalpine Warbler C. cantillans, was seen along Quarter Wall (Stuart Cossey).

Record accepted by BBRC as Eastern or Western Subalpine Warbler.

Firecrest

Regulus ignicapilla

[Common Firecrest] (pp.220–221)

Selected new records

 

Earliest and latest since 2006 (last year covered in full by The Birds of Lundy): Earliest in spring 14 Mar 2020 (one); Latest in spring 29 May 2012 (singing male). Earliest in autumn 28 Aug 2021 (one); Latest in autumn 20 Nov 2019 – excludes presumed wintering individuals seen from Dec 2008 to Feb 2009, in Feb 2011, from Dec 2017 to Jan 2018, and from Dec 2020 to Mar 2021.

2008

Winter record

22 to 24 Dec – One to two birds present; see also Jan/Feb 2009.

2009

Winter record

20 Jan & 2 Feb – Singles in Millcombe; the latter during the severe cold snap of early Feb. Presumably one of the birds seen in Dec 2008.

Strong autumn passage

15 Sep to 29 Oct – The first of the autumn were two on 15 Sep. Records of ones and twos followed on a further nine dates until 14 Oct, then a run of almost daily counts up to and including 29 Oct, with maxima of five on 21st and six on 18th, making this species both more frequent and more numerous than the usually much commoner Goldcrest.

2011

Winter record

17 Feb – A male and a female in trees below the Beach Road (Alan & Sandra Rowland).

2012

Singing male during spring passage

29 May – A male was in full song in Millcombe (Tony Taylor).

2014

High spring passage count

20 Mar – Five; this remains the highest one-day count during spring passage since The Birds of Lundy was published in 2007.

Singing male during spring passage

26 May – A singing male was near the Terrace Trap (Paul Holt & Philip Lymbery).

2015

Strong autumn passage

8 Sep to 31 Oct – A strong autumn passage was noted between 8 Sep (one) and 31 Oct (three). There were records on 40 days altogether, with peaks of four on 14 Sep, six on 15 Sep, four on 28 Sep, five on 12 Oct, eight on 15 Oct and four on 16 Oct. All other counts involved one to three birds. Nineteen (a record year) were ringed during the autumn. The count of eight on 15 Oct remains the highest one-day count during autumn passage since The Birds of Lundy was published in 2007.

2016

Singing male during spring passage

28 May – One was singing in lower Millcombe (Tony Taylor).

2017

Winter record

2 to 28 Dec – A single bird was seen on five scattered dates during this period; preseumed to be the same individual seen in late Jan 2018.

2018

Winter record

27 to 29 Jan – A female was seen daily in Millcombe; presumed the same individual as seen in Dec 2017.

2019

Late date in autumn

20 Nov – A single bird on this date was the latest in autumn since publication of The Birds of Lundy in 2007 (with the exception of individuals that overwintered in 2008/09, 2017/18 and 2020/21).

2020

Early date in spring

14 Mar – A single bird on this date was the earliest in spring (except for overwintering birds in some years) since publication of The Birds of Lundy in 2007.

2021

Early date in autumn

28 to 31 Aug – A single bird daily in Millcombe Pines was the earliest in autumn since publication of The Birds of Lundy in 2007.

 

Ringing

Ringing recovery: A Firecrest ringed as a first-year female on Lundy on 14 Oct 2006 (ring no. BCE530) was found freshly dead at Street, Somerset on 16 Dec 2007 (428 days; 135 km; E 92°). This is only the third ringing movement of a Firecrest involving Lundy.

Ringing recovery: A Firecrest ringed as a first-year male on Lundy on 18 Sep 2009 (ring no. CVJ628) was found dead at Gulval, Penzance, Cornwall on 09 Dec 2010 (447 days; 132 km; SSW 208°). This is the fourth ringing movement of a Firecrest involving Lundy and is remarkably similar in terms of distance and timing to the 2007 recovery in Somerset (above). In both cases the implication is of Firecrests returning to SW England in successive winters.

Photo: October 2014 © Richard Campey.

Goldcrest

Regulus regulus

(pp.219–220)

Selected new records

 

Additional information p.220 table (b): the 2nd-year bird ringed in Cornwall on 27 Mar 1996 was a male.

2008

Notable autumn-passage count

17 Oct – A fall brought 500 to the island.

2009

Unusually poor autumn passage

There were unusually low numbers in autumn (daily maxima of six in Sep and five in Oct), perhaps due to a combination of weather-related factors, including the severe cold spell in Feb, followed by a cool, wet breeding season in north and west Britain and Ireland, where ringing has suggested that most of the Goldcrests passing through Lundy in autumn originate. Goldcrests were so scarce in Oct that Firecrests were slightly more numerous and much more frequently recorded; a most unusual occurrence.

Winter record

28 Dec – One.

2011

Winter record

1 Feb – One.

2012

Winter records

28 Jan to 12 Feb – Singles recorded on five dates and two on 6 Feb.

2013

Notable spring-passage count

12 Apr – A count of 40. remains the highest spring-passage total since The Birds of Lundy was published in 2007.

Large falls of autumn migrants

5 to 9 Oct – A fall of 1,300+ (of which 141 ringed) on 5th, coincided with a major arrival of Chiffchaffs, Blackcaps and other migrants, but only 30 remained on 6th. A further influx, estimated at 1,000 birds, occurred on 9th. These remain (as of the end of 2023) by far the highest autumn-passage totals since The Birds of Lundy was published in 2007 and interestingly occurred in the same year as the highest spring-passage count. This suggests, circumstantially, that populations may already have been high in spring and that a good breeding season followed, though the prevailing weather during both migration periods will also have played a significant role in determining the numbers making landfall on Lundy.

Winter record

29 Dec – One.

2016

Winter records

28 & 29 Jan – One.

26 Feb – One.

2017

Notable autumn-passage count

25 Sep – 300 was one of the higher autumn-passage totals of recent years.

Winter records

1 to 30 Dec – Records on 10 dates mostly involved single birds, but there were two on 6th and three on 16th.

2018

Winter records

5 to 28 Jan – Single birds recorded on 5th, 27th & 28th.

2019

Winter records

Jan & Dec – A count of seven (scattered along the East Side) on 13 Jan was the highest number ever recorded on the island in Jan. Up to three were present on nine days in Dec.

2020

Winter records

Jan & Dec – Ones and twos recorded in both months.

2021

Notable spring-passage count

20 Mar – A count of 41 remains (as of the end of 2023) the highest spring-passage total since The Birds of Lundy was published in 2007.

Winter records

1 to 31 Dec – Up to six logged throughout the month.

2022

Winter records

Up to five were logged in Jan & Feb, and two in Dec.

2023

Confirmed breeding

A pair bred successfully in the pines on the northern side of Millcombe, fledging three young on 14 Jul. This was the first confirmation of breeding on the island since 2000.

 

Ringing

Ringing control – late notification: A Goldcrest ringed as an adult male at Hartland Point, Devon on 04 Sep 1988 (ring no. 9N9264) was controlled on Lundy on 21 Sep 1988 (17 days; 20 km; NNW 328°). The details of this movement were only received in 2020, some 32 years late!

Ringing recovery: A Goldcrest ringed as a first-year male on Lundy on 15 Oct 2012 (ring no. EPY554) was found freshly dead at Ardfert, Co. Kerry, Ireland on 03 Apr 2013 (170 days; 375 km; WNW 290°).

Ringing control: A Goldcrest ringed as a first-year male on Lundy on 19 Sep 2012 (ring no. DPP689) was controlled at East Anstey, Devon on 04 Nov 2013 (411 days; 76 km; ESE 103°).

Ringing control: A Goldcrest ringed as a first-year female on Lundy on 23 Sep 2019 (ring no. LRV011) was controlled at Keyhaven Marshes, Hampshire on 17 Nov 2019 (55 days; 223 km; ESE 103°).

 

For the latest sightings and photos of birds on Lundy visit the
Lundy Bird Observatory website