Richard's Pipit

Anthus richardii

(pp.162–165)

All new records

2007

New records

13 to 20 Oct – At least three different individuals were seen at various locations between Halfway Wall and Castle Hill, including two together on Castle Hill on 17th (multiple observers including C. Baillie, T. Bedford, R. Campey, A.L. Cooper, S.L. Cooper, T. Davis, J. Diamond, T.A. Jones, I. Lakin, J.W. Leonard, R.M Patient and K. Rylands). Records accepted by DBRC. 2007 was the 7th consecutive year for this species on Lundy.

2008

New records

13 to 30 Oct – Singles calling in flight were seen and heard over the East Side on 13 Oct (R.M. Patient) and at the Castle on 15 Oct (S.L. Cooper). The same or another bird was seen near the Airfield, then flying south, on 18 Oct (C.A. Holt et al.). Finally, one was seen in the Lighthouse Field and campsite on 30 Oct (A. Jayne, J. Smith). Based on these records, at least two and as many as four individuals were involved (it is not uncommon for Richard's Pipits to overfly the island or stop off for only a few minutes, whilst other individuals may remain for several days). Records accepted by DBRC. 2008 was the 8th consecutive year for this species on Lundy.

2009

New record

23 Oct – One flew over the Upper East Side Path and Tillage Field (Richard Taylor), then over upper St John’s Valley and southwards over Castle Hill (Andy Jayne) during the mid-afternoon. Record accepted by DBRC.

2010

New record

4 Oct – One flushed just north of Pondsbury was watched and photographed on the ground near the western end of Quarter Wall (A. Jayne). Record accepted by DBRC.

2012

New record

30 Apr to 8 May – One seen and heard in flight at the top of St John’s Valley on 30 Apr (Dave Clifton, Colin McShane, Scott Petrek). What was assumed to be the same bird was flushed near the Old Light and landed at the western end of the Airfield on 5 May (Colin McShane) and was in the same general area, on the south side of the landing strip, on 8 May (Ian Searle). Record accepted by DBRC. Only the second confirmed spring record, following one in Apr 1989 (reports of this species in May 1990 and May 1991 were assessed as ‘not proven’).

2013

New record

24 Oct – One flushed from grassland on the Airfield flew off southwards with Meadow Pipits (James Diamond). Record accepted by DBRC.

2015

New record

27 to 29 Sep – One on West Side north of Quarter Wall on 27th, on Ackland’s Moor on 28th and north of Quarter Wall again on 29th (Tim Cleeves, Martin Kerby). Record accepted by DBRC.

2016

New record – subject to acceptance by DBRC

21 Sep – A large pipit, thought most likely to be this species, was seen and heard in flight over Castle Hill (Andy Jayne).

Blyth's Pipit

Anthus godlewskii

(no entry in the Birds of Lundy)

2007

Update 14 to 16 Oct - The BBRC has determined that the record submitted for a Blyth's Pipit on Castle Hill was ‘not proven’; it would have constituted the first for Lundy had the record been accepted. Source: BBRC website (www.bbrc.org.uk). At least three Richard's Pipits A. richardii were also present on the island in mid-October 2007. The possible Blyth's Pipit was a fourth large pipit.

Tawny Pipit

Anthus campestris

(p.165)

All new records

2008

New record

14 to 17 Sep – One was seen near North Light (A. Williams). Record accepted by DBRC; the 11th for Lundy and the first since Sep 2003.

Note that with effect from 1 Jan 2015, consideration of Tawny Pipit records reverted from county level to BBRC.

Olive-backed Pipit

Anthus hodgsoni

(p.165)

All new records

2009

New record

23 & 24 Oct – One seen and photographed in St John’s Valley (Andy Jayne, Richard Taylor, Tony Taylor) was only the second for Lundy, the first being exactly two decades previously, from 24 to 29 Oct 1989. Record accepted by BBRC.

2012

New record

7 Oct – One seen and heard around the sycamores on the southern side of Millcombe (Ivan Lakin & Kevin Rylands). Record accepted by BBRC. This constitutes the third record for Lundy (the previous occurrences were in Oct 1989 and Oct 2009).

Tree Pipit

Anthus trivialis

(pp.165–166)

Selected new records

Earliest and latest since 2006 (last year covered in full by The Birds of Lundy): Earliest 15 Apr 2013 & 2015 (three on both dates); Latest 20 Oct 2012 (one).

2008

New record

14 Sep – A count of 14 was among the higher daily totals recorded during autumn passage in recent years (day totals only occasionally reach double digits and the all-time maximum was 25 in four years between 1958 and 1973).

2012

New record

4 May – A count of ten was among the highest recorded during spring passage (the all-time maximum being 15 on both 2 May 1972 and 22 April 1975).

Meadow Pipit

Anthus pratensis

(pp.166–167)

Selected new records

 

Photo: Meadow Pipit feeding in Brick Field, 24 Apr 2014 © Richard Campey

 

Ringing

Ringing control: A first-year Meadow Pipit ringed on Lundy on 8 Oct 2013 was controlled 23 days later on 31 Oct 2013 at Cornwood, South Hams, Devon; a movement of 96 km. Ring number D184441.

Red-throated Pipit

Anthus cervinus

(p.168)

All new records

2008

New record

22 Oct – One calling in flight was seen and heard over the Upper East Side Path and Brick Field (T.J. Davis, T.A. Jones). This constitutes the 7th Lundy record and the first since 1997. Record accepted by DBRC.

2013

New record

25 to 27 Oct – One in the Castle Hill area (Tim Davis, James Diamond, Tim Jones et al.). Record accepted by DBRC.

2014

Unproven report

2 Oct – A record of one calling in flight, heading south with Meadow Pipits, over the slope between the Terrace and the Timekeeper’s Hut was assessed by DBRC as 'Not Proven'.

2016

Potential new records under consideration by BBRC

21 Sep – One calling in flight over the Airfield; record currently (Apr 2017) under consideration by BBRC.

18 & 19 Dec – One in the Common and Castle Hill area; record currently (Apr 2017) under consideration by BBRC.

Note that review of Red-throated Pipit records reverted from county level to BBRC with effect from 1 Jan 2015.

Rock Pipit

Anthus petrosus

[Eurasian Rock Pipit] (p.168)

Selected new records

2009

New record

9 to 11 Dec – Flocks were observed feeding on top of the island, e.g. 15 by the Church on 11th, with a maximum count of 30 on 9th, including a flock of some 20 feeding near Old Light. With a further 18 birds recorded in the north and west of the island on 10th, the overall early-winter population was almost certainly in excess of 50 individuals. 

2012

New record

25 Oct – The autumn maximum was 29 along the west sidelands from South West Point as far north as Threequarter Wall.

Brambling

Fringilla montifringilla

(p.252)

Selected new records

Earliest and latest since 2006 (last year covered in full by The Birds of Lundy): Earliest 7 Oct 2007 (one) & 7 Oct 2012 (four); Latest 23 May 2009 (one), equalling the record late date set by a long-staying male in May 1994.

2007

New record

19 Oct – Highest autumn count: 15.

2008

New record

25 Oct – Highest autumn count: 20.

2009

New records

16 Mar – One.

23 May – One; no information on circumstances, but equals the latest ever date (see above).

29 Oct – Highest autumn count: 6.

2010

Summary

No late-winter or spring passage records.

25 Oct – Highest autumn count: 15.

2011

Summary

No late-winter or spring passage records.

25 Oct – Highest autumn count: 6.

2012

Summary

No late-winter or spring passage records.

25 Oct – Highest autumn count: 25.

2013

Summary

No late-winter or spring passage records.

24 Oct – Highest autumn count: 4.

2014

Summary

No late-winter or spring passage records. Autumn passage:

21 to 31 Oct – Records on five dates; max 4 on 30th.

2015

Summary

No late-winter or spring passage records. Autumn passage:

14 to 31 Oct – Records on eight dates; max 7 on 28th.

Chaffinch

Fringilla coelebs

[Common Chaffinh] (pp. 249-251)

Selected new records

2007

Autumn passage summary

Autumn migration peaked from 13-21 Oct, with maxima of 6,000 on 18th, 9,500 on 19th and 5,000 on 20th. This was one of the larger Chaffinch movements recorded on Lundy; numbers reached 5,000 or more on only a dozen occasions in previous years.

2008

Autumn passage summary

Autumn migration peaked from 17-25 Oct, with a maximum of 5,000 on 25 Oct.

2009

Autumn passage summary

Visible migration in autumn was less spectacular than in 2007 & 2008, with a maximum of 1,200 on 19 Oct and only five other daily counts of more than 200.

2010

Autumn passage summary

Autumn maxima of 1,500 on 17 Oct, 5,700 on 22nd, 8,000 on 25th and 1,000 on 28th.

2011

Autumn passage summary

One of the poorest autumns of recent year for visible Chaffinch migration, with maxima of 850 on 25 Oct and 920 on 1 Nov.

2012

Autumn passage summary

Autumn migration peaked from 19-25 Oct, with a maximum of 2,500 on 25 Oct. 600 were counted heading south in 90 minutes on 13 Nov, showing that autumn passage can be quite protracted.

2013

Autumn passage summary

Due to adverse weather conditions, one of the worst years on record for visible autumn migration, with a maximum of just 600 on 24 Oct.

2014

Autumn passage summary

Unusually mild conditions, with persistently adverse winds for migrants from northern Europe, meant that October finch migration was close to non-existent. Chaffinch counts remained stubbornly low, with numbers only exceeding 100 on six dates in the last week of Oct; the highest totals being 1,400 on 28th, 1,500 on 29th and 350 on 30th. Numbers had dwindled to 50 by 1 Nov, with 120 on 6 Nov being the only further obvious influx of migrants.

2015

Autumn passage summary

For a third successive autumn, weather conditions in late Oct and early Nov were unfavourable for major daytime movements of finches over Lundy and there were just four dates – all in the last week of Oct – when Chaffinch numbers exceeded 100; the maximum of 300 occurred on 26th.

See below for details of a Chaffinch ringed on Lundy in Oct 2009 that was controlled for the second time in Norway in Apr 2015, having previously been caught there in Apr 2012.

 

Ringing

Ringing recovery: A Chaffinch ringed as a first-year female on Lundy on 7 Sep 2007 (ring no. T949551) was found dead, having been taken by a cat, at Okehampton, Devon on 20 Apr 2008 (226 days; 67 km; 137°).

Ringing recovery: A Chaffinch ringed as a first-year female on Lundy on 26 Oct 2007 (ring no. V935134) was found dead (hit window) at Le Chene, Saint-Colomban, Loire-Atlantique, France (47°00’N, 1°34’W) on 17 Feb 2008 (114 days; 515 km; 155°). This is the furthest south that any British-ringed Chaffinch is known to have moved and may give an indication of the onward direction followed by the very large numbers that passed through Lundy during October 2007.

Ringing control: A Chaffinch ringed as a first-year female on Lundy on 14 Oct 2009 (ring no. L026586) was controlled at Bømyra, Randaberg, Rogaland, Norway (a few km NW of Stavanger) on 23 Apr 2012 (922 days; 1,086 km; 37°).

Ringing control: A Chaffinch ringed as a first-year female on Lundy on 20 Oct 2012 (ring no. D184049) was controlled at Mulvika, Holmestrand, Vestfold, Norway on 04 Apr 2014 (531 days; 1,320 km; 46°).

Ringing control: The Chaffinch ringed as a first-year female on Lundy on 14 Oct 2009 (ring no. L026586) was controlled for a second time (see above for details of earlier control in Apr 2012) at the very same location, i.e. Bømyra, Randaberg, Rogaland, Norway on 6 Apr 2015 (2,000 days; 1,086 km; 37°).

Hawfinch

Coccothraustes coccothraustes

(pp.263–264)

All new records

2008

New record

19 to 21 Oct – A single bird was in Millcombe and the lower part of St John’s Valley, where it was often to be seen on the ground feeding on seed put out by visiting birders.

2009

New record

4 May – One in Millcombe (John Horton). Record accepted by Devon Bird Recorder.

2010

New record

17 to 28 Oct – Records of single birds on 17th, 18th, 25th (male trapped and ringed), 27th and 28th were presumed to relate to one individual. Record accepted by Devon Bird Recorder.

2011

New record

6 May – One seen and heard flying south along the East Side at Halfway Wall (Mark Telfer). Record accepted by Devon Bird Recorder.

2014

New record

5 May – One was in Millcombe (Andy Jayne). Record accepted by Devon Bird Recorder.

2015

New records

30 & 31 Oct – A male was trapped and ringed in Millcombe on 30 Oct (Rob Duncan et al.). Of three seen the following day, one came in off the sea and flew up Millcombe at 07.20 hrs, while two were
together in lower Millcombe before flying off towards the South Light at 07.40 hrs (Justin Zantboer et al.). Records accepted by Devon Bird Recorder.

Common Rosefinch

Carpodacus erythrinus

(pp.261–262)

All new records

2007

New record

20 Oct – A female or immature calling in flight as it headed south over Pondsbury with other finches (R.M. Patient). Record accepted by DBRC. The most recent autumn record prior to this was in Oct 2005.

2008

New records

9 & 10 Jun – A first-summer male in Millcombe, close to Government House, on 9th and between Brambles and Millcombe House on 10th, when it was also heard singing (A. Jayne). This is the first spring record for Lundy since 4 Jun 1999, when one was heard singing in Millcombe. Record accepted by DBRC.

26 Sep to 4 Oct – One was seen regularly in the Millcombe and St John’s area (R. Campey, B. Heasman, I. Lakin et al.).

24 Oct – One seen briefly in Millcombe (I. Lakin, K. Rylands). The most recent autumn occurrence prior to 2008 was in Oct 2005. Record accepted by DBRC.

2009

New record

18 Sep – A first-winter bird was trapped and ringed in Millcombe (Colin McShane, Rob Skeates et al.). Record accepted by DBRC.

2010

New records

8 Sep to 3 Oct – One seen in Millcombe on 15 Sep (Richard Taylor). One trapped and ringed in Millcombe 15 Sep (Steve & Anna Sutcliffe et al.). A first-winter bir was trapped, ringed and photographed in Millcombe on 18 Sep (Andy Turner & Chris Dee). The bird ringed on 15 Sep was retrapped in Millcombe on 18 & 23 Sep. A first-winter bird bearing a ring on its right leg was seen in Millcombe on 2 & 3 Oct (Tim Jones). All records accepted by DBRC; at least two, potentially three, individuals involved.

2011

New records

8 to 16 Oct – A first-year bird trapped and ringed in Millcombe on 8 Oct remained until at least 13 Oct (Tim Ball et al.). Another first-year bird was trapped and ringed in Millcombe on 16 Oct (Tony Taylor et al.). Records accepted by DBRC.

2012

New records

21 Sep to 11 Oct – A first-winter bird seen in Millcombe on 21 Sep was trapped and ringed there on the same day, and was retrapped in Millcombe on 25 Sep and seen again on 27 Sep (Andy Jayne, Chris Dee et al.). A first-winter bird was in Millcombe on 3 Oct, with one (age unspecified) on the Terrace on 4 Oct (Julian Bowden & Tony Simpson). One was seen and heard in flight in Millcombe on 11 Oct (Ivan Lakin & Kevin Rylands). In the absence of any firm evidence to the contrary, all records could have referred to a single long-staying individual, though it seems quite likely that three individuals may have been involved (21-27 Sep, 3-4 Oct and 11 Oct). Record accepted by DBRC.

2013

New records

28 & 31 May – A first-year male was singing in Millcombe (Paul Holt, Philip Lymbery).

5 & 6 Oct – A first-winter bird was ringed, having been mist-netted in Millcombe. It was retrapped the following day, when a second bird, an adult female, was ringed, having also been mist-netted in Millcombe (John Haddaway & John Horton). Records accepted by DBRC.

2014

New records

27 to 31 May – One was heard calling and identified independently (on call alone) by two birders on 27th: first, in Millcombe, on the slopes of the Ugly and also further up the valley at 06.00 hrs (Richard Taylor) and then near the campsite at 06.20 hrs (P. Holt). On 31st a first-summer bird flew over Brambles before perching in the top of a sycamore and flying off towards Millcombe, calling as it went (Pete Clabburn, Charles Crundwell, P. Long).

10 Sep – A juvenile was trapped and ringed (Nik Ward).

Records accepted by DBRC.

2015

New records

29 & 30 May – A female or first-summer male was in Millcombe (Philip & Helen Lymbery, Paul McGowan).

14 Oct – One calling in flight at least ten times over Millcombe and St John’s Valley was heard from the northern flank of Castle Hill during the course of about ten minutes from 07.47 hrs during strong visible migration of Chaffinches and Redwings (James Diamond & Tim Jones; also heard in Millcombe by Ivan Lakin & Kevin Rylands).

Records accepted by DBRC.

2016

New records – subject to acceptance by DBRC

5 to 8 Jun – A 1st-summer male singing above the Terrace on 5th and what was presumably the same individual singing in Millcombe on 7th & 8th (Philip & Helen Lymbery, Tim Jones).

15 to 17 Sep – A 1st-winter bird in Millcombe, originally seen on 15th, was trapped and ringed on 16th and seen again on 17th (A.J. Bellamy, Peter Slader, Nik Ward).

Bullfinch

Pyrrhula pyrrhula

[Eurasian Bullfinch] (pp.262–263)

All new records

2008

New records

9 May – One female.

6 & 21 Oct – A single female on 6th and a single bird (sex not specified) on 21st.

2011

New records

25 Mar to 18 May – A male in Millcombe on 25 Mar (Paul & Mike Hopes) and 2 Apr; two males in Millcombe on 10 Apr; one on 13 Apr; and further singles on 9 & 18 May.

2 & 3 Nov– A female was seen in Millcombe, mainly close to Blue Bung. Presumably the same bird (though no details were given in the logbook) was also reported on 1 Nov.

2012

New records

27 Mar – A female was feeding on buds in upper Millcombe (Tim Davis & Tim Jones).

22 Oct – One (circumstances unknown).

2014

New records

15 Apr – A female was trapped and ringed in St John’s Valley (Rob Duncan).

24 Aug – One was calling persistently in lower Millcombe (Richard Taylor & Tony Taylor).

2015

New records

An exceptional year with records in four months. Birds were present in Apr/May, though there was no evidence of any breeding behaviour and all are presumed to have been passage migrants.

8 Jan – A male was in Millcombe on 8 Jan (Jim Campbell).

6 to 15 Apr – A pair were in Millcombe on 6th, with a female trapped and ringed on 7th. An exceptional five birds – four females and a male – were in Millcombe on 8th, of which two females and the male were trapped and ringed. The influx continued with a male and a female trapped and ringed in St John’s Valley on 9th (all records 6–9 Apr Rob Duncan).A male was still in Millcombe on 14th (Paul Holt) and one (sex not determined) was calling and seen briefly in flight on 15th (Tim Jones).

25 Apr – One female.

13 to 15 May – One (sex not reported) near Brambles on 13th was heard there again on 14th & 15th.

28 Sep – A female was in Millcombe walled gardens on 28 Sep (Ryan Miller).

Trumpeter Finch

Bucanetes githagineus

(no entry in The Birds of Lundy)

Species added to the Lundy List since The Birds of Lundy was published in 2007

All new records

2011

New record

13 to 25 May – An unknown finch seen and photographed along the main track near Tibbetts by Barbara & Colin Canavan on 13 May was identified from the photo by Steve O’Donnell. Shaun Barnes subsequently relocated the bird at Halfway Wall and obtained a number of excellent photographs. The bird remained until it was last seen on 25 May affording excellent views to large numbers of visiting birders. It divided its time between Halfway Wall, Quarter Wall and the Old Hospital. Record accepted by BBRC.

What was presumably the same bird was relocated on the nearby North Devon mainland at Morte Point (near Woolacombe) on 2 Jun.

Trumpeter Finch, 13 May 2011
© Shaun Barnes

Greenfinch

Carduelis chloris

[European Greenfinch] (pp.253–254)

Selected new records

2007

New record

18 Oct – The autumn maximum of 23 remains the highest count since publication of The Birds of Lundy.

2008

New record

28 Dec – One; an unusual date.

2009

New record

10 Dec – A male near Government House; rare in winter.

2013

New record

19 to 23 Apr – A male calling from a perch above the Terrace on 19th, in full song in Millcombe on 20th and last seen on 23rd. The only record of a singing male in recent years.

Linnet

Carduelis chloris

[Common Linnet] (pp.256–257)

Selected new records

2015

13 & 15 Sep – Autumn passage peaked at 400; one of the highest counts since The Birds of Lundy was published.

Lesser Redpoll

Carduelis cabaret

(pp.259–260)

Selected new records

2008

New records

6 & 9 May – Eight birds on both dates equalled the then record spring count for the island (which was subsequently exceeded in 2012 – see below).

29 Sep – A count of 14 equalled the second-highest ever recorded on Lundy and remains the highest daily total since publication of The Birds of Lundy. The record stands at 25 on 9 Oct 1997.

2009

New record

Dec – Unusually, singles were reported on four dates in Dec, the last of these on 28th.

2010

New record

Jan & Feb – Following on from the Dec records in 2009, one was seen daily on feeders outside Pig’s Paradise from 1 to 11 Jan, with the same or another from 30 Jan to 3 Feb, one on three dates to the end of Feb, and daily throughout Mar.

2012

New record

2 May – A new spring-passage record of ten.

2013

New record

26 May – Nine was again an unusually high spring count, especially for so late in the season.

As for Siskins, autumn passage was exceptionally poor, with the only records being single birds on three dates.

Common Redpoll

Carduelis flammea

(pp.258–259)

All new records

1986

New record

29 Oct – A first-winter male was trapped and ringed (A.M. Taylor). This record has only recently come to light and now constitutes the first for the island, as well as the first for Devon. It was not available for the review by Diamond (2003), which gave 30 Sep 1988 as the first record for Lundy.

1988

Update

30 Sep – The record of one trapped and ringed on this date now becomes the 2nd occurrence for Lundy (in the light of the recently discovered record for 1986 detailed above).

2006

New record

8 Oct – One showing characteristics of the race C. f. islandica in Millcombe (A.L. Cooper, S.L. Cooper, R.M. Patient). This record came to light after publication of The Birds of Lundy and did not appear in the 2006 LFS logbook or 2006 LFS Annual Report but is listed as “pending” on p.158 of the 2006 Devon Bird Report. It constitutes the 5th record for the island.

2007

New record

26 Oct – A first-winter female was caught and ringed in St John's Valley (A.M. Taylor et al.). Record accepted by DBRC. This constitutes the 6th Lundy record. Lundy currently accounts for all Common Redpoll records for the whole of Devon.

Crossbill

Loxia curvirostra

[Red Crossbill] (pp.260–261)

All new records

2008

New records

5 Sep to 29 Oct – Recorded on seven dates, with a maximum of five on 28 Sep. The first of these was a juvenile that flew down the East Side calling before landing in pines on the southern side of Millcombe. It flew out from the island several times, but returned on each occasion, at one point perching on the ridge of the Church roof! (Tony Taylor, pers. comm.).

2009

New records

14–29 Jul – Recorded on six dates: a male in pines near The Ugly on 14th; a female at Halfway Wall gate on 15th; two males at the Eastern end of Threequarter Wall on 17th; three males and two females on 18th; a male on the Lower East Side Path close to Millcombe on 26th; and a male and female in the trees below Brambles on 29th (J. Cooper, Chris Flower, Paul James et al.).

16 Sep – Four.

2010

New record

8 Oct – A single male seen between Millcombe and the Terrace (Andy Jayne et al.). Andy’s entry in the LFS logbook reads: “At about 09.10 hrs I flushed a female Sparrowhawk from the small quarry just south of VC Quarry. A split second later a male Crossbill appeared right in front of me at the same spot and did not move for several minutes. After a while I noticed that the bird had a lot of feather damage on its nape, as though it had been plucked. It seems likely that the Crossbill had been taken by the Sparrowhawk but I had disturbed it before it had the chance to tuck into its meal! At 09.30 hrs the Crossbill flew off south and was later seen in Millcombe.”

2012

New records

22 & 27 Sep – Two on 22nd, followed by four (three males and a female) flying low over Castle Hill on 27th (Tom Bedford, Richard Campey, Tim Davis et al.).

Goldfinch

Carduelis carduelis

[European Goldfinch] (pp.254–255)

Selected new records

 

Clarification p.255, first paragraph, third to fifth lines: the bird found at Lee Mill, Plymouth on 8 June 1994 had been shot and was likely to have been reasonably fresh for the finder to know this. It is therefore most likely that this bird was in its breeding area when killed.

2011

New record

8 Oct – A count of 400 is the second-highest ever recorded for the island, following 450 on 12 Oct 2005 and remains the highest total since publication of The Birds of Lundy.

2012

New record

24 Apr – A count of 60 is the highest daily total during spring migration since publication of The Birds of Lundy.

2014

Confirmed breeding

Successful breeding on the island was confirmed on 9 & 11 Jun, when recently fledged juveniles were watched being fed by adults in Millcombe, in the sycamores around the stream running down from Brambles. A pair was still feeding young (presumably a second brood) on 12 Aug.

Photo: Adult Goldfinch, Millcombe, 25 Apr 2014 © Richard Campey

2015

Confirmed breeding

A pair was seen with nesting material in Millcombe on 6 Jun and successful breeding was confirmed when an adult was feeding a juvenile near Blue Bung on 4 Jul and five juveniles were begging for food in Millcombe on 8 Jul.

 

Ringing

Ringing recovery: A Goldfinch ringed as an adult male on Lundy on 24 Oct 2006 (ring no. T949325) was found dead (killed by a cat) at Tiverton, Devon on 17 Jan 2007 (85 days; 89 km; 110°).

Ringing control: A Goldfinch ringed as a juvenile on Lundy on 19 Sep 2012 (ring no. Y70502) was controlled at Ledstone, Kingsbridge, Devon on 4 Nov 2012 (46 days; 116 km; 147°).

Ringing control: A Goldfinch ringed as a second-year male at Oxwich marsh, Swansea on 12 Apr 2014 (ring no. D857603) was controlled on Lundy on 25 Apr 2014.

Ringing control: A Goldfinch ringed as first-year bird on Lundy on 23 Sep 2014 (ring no. D184888) was found as a road casualty, with a damaged wing, but later released, at Kilkhampton, Cornwall on 23 Oct 2015 (401 days; 36 km; 159°).

These are the third to sixth known movements involving Goldfinches ringed on Lundy during autumn migration. Five of these birds were found in mainland Devon or Cornwall during the period late-Oct to Apr. This (very!) small sample suggests that south-west England may be an important wintering area for Goldfinches migrating through Lundy in autumn, though the Oct/Nov and Apr birds could equally have been staging, en route to or from wintering grounds in continental Europe.

Siskin

Carduelis spinus

[Eurasian Siskin] (pp.255–256)

Selected new records

2007

Exceptional influx

6 Oct to 13 Nov – An unprecedented autumn for this species on Lundy, with a major movement occurring during Oct. Counts reached three figures daily from 11-23 Oct, peaking at 1,000 on 14 Oct and 800 on 18th. There were also 100 on 7 Nov. Flocks were feeding voraciously on yarrow seed on Castle Hill, on nettle seeds in Millcombe and St Helen's Combe, and were watched ‘leaf gleaning’ in St Helen's Copse. The onward movements of some of these birds are indicated by the following ringing controls and a recovery. All were found east of Lundy between late Jan and mid-Apr – perhaps beginning to move north-east through the UK and The Netherlands having spent the early part of the winter further south and west. Given the date, the bird in The Netherlands would probably still have been far from its breeding grounds and, overall, these movements do not provide any real evidence of where the 2007 Siskin invasion originated.

2013

Sparse autumn passage

Very unusually, there were just five autumn records, all of single birds, except for six on 26 Nov. While numbers recorded during autumn passage in 2008–2012 did not reach the dizzy heights of 2007, the annual maxima were all of 100 or more birds. This emphasizes just how poor a season it was in 2013.

2014

Poor autumn passage for the second year running

There were again autumn records on only five dates, 11 to 29 Oct, with a maximum of 40 on 28th.

2015

Better showing during autumn passage

Frequency was much higher, with records on 38 dates, 6 Sep to 31 Oct, though numbers remained relatively low, with the max of 45 occurring on the early date of 13 Sep (peak migration is usually in Oct).

 

Ringing

Ringing control: A Siskin ringed as a first-year male on Lundy on 21 Oct 2007 (ring no. T949824) was controlled at Thetford, Norfolk, on 14 Apr 2008 (176 days; 395 km; 70°).

Ringing control: A Siskin ringed as a first-year male on Lundy on 20 Oct 2007 (ring no. V487601) was controlled at Watchet, Somerset on 23 Mar 2008 (158 days; 92 km; 91°).

Ringing control: A Siskin ringed as a first-year female on Lundy on 20 Oct 2007 (ring no. V487662) was controlled at Bratton, Somerset, on 20 Feb 2008 (123 days; 81 km; 88°)

Ringing recovery: A Siskin ringed as a first-year male on Lundy on 27 Oct 2007 (ring no. V935175) was found dead (hit window) at Tielekenshoeven, Rosmalen, Noord-Brabant, The Netherlands on 29 Jan 2008 (94 days; 698 km; 86°).

Ringing control: A Siskin ringed as an adult male on Lundy on 20 Oct 2007 (ring no. V487649) was controlled at Cressage, Shropshire (14 km south-east of Shrewsbury) on 5 Mar 2011 (1,232 days; 216 km; 42°)

Snow Bunting

Plectrophenax nivalis

(pp.266–267)

Summary of all new records

2007

New records

15 Oct to 25 Dec – Two on 15 Oct then one on 4, 9 & 25 Dec.

2008

New records

3 Oct to 31 Dec – Records of single birds on eight dates.

2009

New records

4 to 17 Mar – One on 4th, three in Brick/Tillage Fields 13th to 15th, two remaining on 16th and one on 17th.

25 Sep to 10 Dec – Records of single birds on four dates.

Records accepted by Devon Bird Recorder.

2010

New records

5 to 29 Oct – Records on ten dates, with a maximum of six on 11th. Records accepted by Devon Bird Recorder.

2011

New records

4 Oct to 29 Dec ­– A strong autumn passage with records on 26 dates from 4 Oct to 10 Nov, including a maximum of 20 on 5 & 6 Oct. Thereafter, ones and twos on three dates at the end of Dec. Records accepted by Devon Bird Recorder.

2012

New records

29 Aug to 11 Nov – One near Hanmers on the exceptionally early date of 29 Aug; in fact the earliest autumn date on record for Lundy (a distinction previously held by three on 1 Sep 1974). Further occurrences on 23 dates from 3 Oct to 11 Nov, with a maximum of three on 3, 7–12 & 27 Oct. Records accepted by Devon Bird Recorder.

2013

New records

21 Oct to 27 Nov – Recorded on 11 dates, with a maximum of four on 9 & 17 Nov. Records accepted by Devon Bird Recorder.

2014

New records

9 & 10 Mar – A single male in the Brick Field area was the only record for the late-winter and spring migration periods.

12 Oct to 19 Nov – A relatively poor autumn-passage showing brought records on 11 dates, 12 Oct to 19 Nov. These all involved single birds, with the exception of three along the main track between Quarter Wall and Threequarter Wall on 22 & 24 Oct and two just south of Halfway Wall on 19 Nov. One was seen being chased by a Merlin over Rat Island and the Landing Bay on 20 Oct. Records accepted by Devon Bird Recorder.

Snow Bunting, Oct 2014 © Richard Campey.

2015

New record

A very poor year; the only record was of two on 8 Oct – one at North End and one at Quarter Wall gate (Julian Bowden & Tony Simpson). Record accepted by Devon Bird Recorder.

2016

New records – subject to acceptance by Devon Bird Recorder

18 Oct to 1 Nov – Records of single birds on three dates only. There was a further unconfirmed report of one on 18 Nov.

Lapland Bunting

Calcarius lapponicus

[Lapland Longspur] (pp.265–266)

Summary of all new records

2007

New records

7 to 29 Oct – Recorded on 12 dates (multiple observers) with a maximum of at least seven on 18th, including three together on the Airfield (T. Bedford, R. Campey, T. Davis et al.), constituting the highest daily count since six were recorded on 22 Oct 1994. Records accepted by DBRC.

2008

New records

25 Sep to 22 Oct – Occurrences at scattered locations on ten dates. Most records involved single birds, but two were reported on 27 & 28 Sep and 22 Oct (T. Bedford, R.J. Campey, A.L. Cooper et al.).

2009

New records

1 & 2 Oct – Two calling in flight over Tibbetts on 1st; one calling in flight near Government House on 2nd. Records accepted by Devon Bird Recorder.

2010

New records

29 Aug to 15 Nov – Two on the main track to the south of Quarter Wall on an exceptionally early date (the previous earliest record for Lundy was 31 Aug 1977) were the vanguard of what became a spectacular autumn passage – a phenomenon observed elsewhere in the UK. Recorded on a further 31 dates to 15 Nov, with maxima of 16 on 17 Sep, 25 on 19 Sep and at least 30 on 7 Oct. It is very likely that that the overall number of birds passing through reached or exceeded the record set in the autumn of 1953 when “probably over 100 individuals” occurred. Records accepted by Devon Bird Recorder.

2011

New records

6 to 14 Oct ­– Records on five dates (including one found dead on 11th), with a maximum of six on 14th.

28 Dec – One along the main track between Halfway and Threequarter Walls (J. Leonard) was only the third winter record for Lundy.

Records accepted by Devon Bird Recorder.

2012

New records

6 to 27 Oct ­– Autumn passage records of single birds only on seven dates. Records accepted by Devon Bird Recorder.

2013

New records

22 to 24 Oct – One on 22nd, followed by two on 23rd & 24th. Records accepted by Devon Bird Recorder.

2014

New records

29 Sep to 29 Oct – Autumn passage records on five dates, all involving single birds. Records accepted by Devon Bird Recorder.

2015

New records

19 Sep to 14 Oct – Autumn passage records on four dates, all of single birds, except for two on 28 Sep. Records accepted by Devon Bird Recorder.

2016

New records – subject to acceptance by Devon Bird Recorder

1 to 20 Sep – Autumn passage records on four dates, all involving single birds.

Rose-breasted Grosbeak

Pheucticus ludovicianus

(p.274 & endnote no. 219 p.304)

1985

Correction The bird trapped on 27 Oct was a first-winter female, not a first-winter male as stated. The entries in both the 1985 Devon Bird Report and 1985 BBRC report were mistaken and British Birds later published a correction to this effect (British Birds 81: 593).

Yellowhammer

Emberiza citrinella

(p.268)

All new records

2010

New record

14 Nov – A male was photographed near Pondsbury (R. Percival); the first record for the island since Dec 2005.

2012

New record

5 May – A female perched on top of a sycamore in Millcombe, calling constantly, before flying off towards the north (Ivan Lakin). Sadly, as a result of widespread population decline due to changing agricultural practices on the mainland, this has become an extremely rare species on Lundy.

2014

New record

20 Apr – One seen near the Lodge may also have been present on 19th (Alfredo Sánchez-Tójar, Charlie Smith, Issie Winney).

Ortolan Bunting

Emberiza hortulana

(pp.269–271)

All new records

2008

New record

16 Sep – A first-winter bird was seen in Millcombe (A. Williams), the first since Aug 2005. Record accepted by DBRC.

2009

New record

25 Sep – One seen perched briefly on Threequarter Wall adjacent to the main track at 11.30 hrs was also heard calling in flight. The same or another was on short grass and calling in flight close to Halfway Wall at 15.30 hrs (I. Lakin). Record accepted by DBRC.

2010

New record

16 Sep – A first-winter bird with a flock of Meadow Pipits in St Helen’s Field (Steve & Anna Sutcliffe). Record accepted by DBRC.

2011

New record

2 & 3 Oct – A first-winter bird at the head of St John’s Valley and on Castle Hill during the evening of 2 Oct was relocated on the Airfield the following morning and later seen flying towards the Old Light (James Diamond et al.) Record accepted by DBRC.

Photo: First-winter Ortolan Bunting, Airfield, 3 Oct 2011 © Tom Bedford

2012

New record

7 to 24 Sep – A first-winter bird found near the Casbah in Millcombe on 7 Sep (Richard Taylor) was seen on the slope below Hanmers on 9 Sep (Tony Taylor). What may have been the same bird, but which seems at least as likely to have been a second individual given the long gap between sightings, was in Millcombe, just above the walled gardens, on 21 Sep (Andy Jayne) and still present on 24th (John Griffin et al.). Record accepted by DBRC.

2015

New records

11 to 16 Sep – Three were in the north-east corner of the Lighthouse Field near the boundary with Bull’s Paradise and the lambing shed on 11th (Dave Chown, Richard Taylor et al.). Two
remained on 12th and one on 13th & 16th. Two of the three originally present on 11th were aged – from photographs – as first-winter individuals; the third bird was aged as an adult.

25 to 28 Sep – A first-winter bird was in the area close to the junction between Brick and Tillage Fields (Richard & Fran Castle, Andy Jayne et al.).

Records accepted by DBRC.

2016

New records – subject to acceptance by DBRC

8 Sep – One in Millcombe (Richard & Rebecca Taylor, Tony Taylor).

14 Sep – A 1st-winter bird in Millcombe (A.J. Bellamy, Peter Slader, Nik Ward).

Rustic Bunting

Emberiza rustica

(p.271)

All new records

2015

27 Sep to 1 Oct – A first-winter male was mist-netted in Millcombe (near Government House), ringed and photographed on 27 Sep (John Horton). Not seen in the field after its release, it was assumed to have left the island but was relocated on 30th along the wall dividing the Lighthouse Field and Tent Field between the old stone-crushing machine and the helipad (Ryan Miller et al.). It was still present in the same area on 1 Oct but could not be found the following day. Record accepted by BBRC. This is the sixth record for the island but the first since Oct 1994.

Note that consideration of Rustic Bunting records reverted from county level to BBRC with effect from 1 Jan 2015.

Rustic Bunting Lundy 27Sep2015 John Horton 1Rustic Bunting, after ringing at Brambles,
27 Sep 2015 © John Horton

Rustic Bunting Lundy 30Sep2015 Ryan Miller 4 close-up copyRustic Bunting, Tent Field wall, 30 Sep 2015
© Ryan Miller

Little Bunting

Emberiza pusilla

(p.271)

All new records

2007

New record

1 Nov – One seen briefly in Millcombe (A. Jayne). Record accepted by DBRC. This constitutes the 14th Lundy record and the 16th individual. The most recent previous sighting was in October 2005.

2010

New record

22 to 25 Feb – A first-winter bird in the Campsite on 22nd and in the vegetable gardens outside Pig’s Paradise on 24th and flying over the Tavern on 25th (John Horton & Neil Trout). Record accepted by DBRC; the 15th for Lundy.

2011

New record

29 Sep – One trapped and ringed in Millcombe (Derek Baggott, Chris Dee, John Griffin, Andy Turner). Record accepted by DBRC; the 16th for Lundy.

2012

New record

24 Oct – One was flushed three times from gorse and Molinia towards the western end of Quarter Wall, near its junction with the Airfield wall, during the morning of 24 Oct (James Diamond). What was presumed to be the same bird was seen in similar habitat on the ridge south of Pondsbury about 90 minutes later (Tim Davis), then relocated in the Tent Field in the afternoon (Richard Campey et al.) where it afforded good if rather brief views, at one time perching obligingly on the helipad rope, allowing itself to be photographed. Record accepted by DBRC; the 17th for Lundy.

2014

Unproven report

25 Oct – A report of one flushed and heard calling in flight, on the eastern side of Castle Hill near Hanmers, was assessed by DBRC as 'Not Proven'.

2015

New record

14 & 16 Oct – An elusive individual was at the western end of Quarter Wall (Ivan Lakin & Kevin Rylands). Seen initially in flight and perched atop dead bracken on 14th, it was relocated on 16th when it was again seen in flight and perched on gorse, giving good views of its head pattern.

Record accepted by DBRC.

Reed Bunting

Emberiza schoeniclus

[Common Reed Bunting] (pp.272–273)

Selected new records

2007

New records

Recorded from 12 to 26 Oct with a max of four on 18th & 26th.

2008

New records

6 Feb – One; the first winter record for many years.

3 Oct to 6 Nov – Records of single birds on six dates.

2009

New records

17 Mar – One.

24 Sep to 26 Oct – Singles on 24 Sep and 1 Oct, plus two on 23 & 26 Oct.

2010

New records

11 Jan – a male photographed in Millcombe; an unusual mid-winter occurrence.

4 to 27 Oct – Records of single birds on seven dates.

2011

New record

4 Oct to 4 Nov – Records on six dates; all of single birds, except for two on 13 Oct.

2012

New records

26 Apr – A male in Middle Park (Alan Rowland).

20 Aug – One; an unusual date.

12 to 28 Oct – Singles on five dates.

2013

New records

24 Oct to 30 Nov – Autumn migrants recorded on five dates, including a maximum of four on 24 Oct.

28 Dec – One; an unusual date.

2014

New records

26 & 29 Apr – One was reported on 26th (L. Armstrong/BirdTrack) and a male was in the marshy area around Quarters Pond and feeding on ‘Alpen’ (!) on the track near Brambles on 29th (Terry Armstrong, Richard Campey, Ann Freeman).

7 to 28 Oct – Recorded on nine dates; mainly involving single birds, but there were two on 22nd & 26th and a notable six on 24th, including a flock of five in gorse towards the western end of Quarter Wall.

Male Reed Bunting feeding outside Brambles, 29 Apr 2014 © Richard Campey

2015

New records

12 to 19 Oct – Three on 12th–14th, rising to four on 15th, five on 16th and six on 17th, including at east four around Quarter Wall, one at Pondsbury and one at Threequarter Wall (many
observers). Finally, one was in Millcombe on 19th. Not recorded in any other month.

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Corn Bunting

Emberiza calandra

(p.273)

All new records

2007

New record

20 Oct – One heard calling in flight over Castle Hill during a morning of strong southward passerine migration. Record subject to acceptance by DBRC. If accepted, this would constitute the 18th LFS record and the first since 1999.

2009

New record

3 May – One was seen and photographed in the lambing shed area of the farm. Record accepted by Devon Bird Recorder; the 19th LFS record.

Yellow-rumped Warbler

Dendroica coronata

[Myrtle Warbler] (p.264)

All new records

2013

New record

28 Oct – One watched at close range in Millcombe for a few minutes (Tim Davis & Tim Jones), showed characteristics of the eastern breeding population known as ‘Myrtle Warbler’ which has, at times and by some authorities, been regarded as a separate species. The arrival of this individual on Lundy was associated with the passage of a deep, fast-moving Atlantic depression, dubbed by the media the ‘St Jude’s Day Storm’, which moved across southern Britain on the night of 27/28 Oct. Several other North American landbird species were recorded elsewhere in the UK around the same time, while another Yellow-rumped Warbler turned up in Co. Galway, Ireland, on 29th. There is one previous Lundy record (the second for Britain) in Nov 1960. Record accepted by BBRC.

 

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