Feral Pigeon

Columba livia

[Rock Dove, Common Pigeon] (p.139)

Selected new records

2016

Unusually high count

11 Jun – An estimated 50 flying north from the Quarries were intercepted above Halfway Wall by two Peregrines, which separated a single pigeon from the flock; the result was not observed (Alan & Sandra Rowland).

Woodpigeon

Columba palumbus

[Common Wood Pigeon] (p.140)

Selected new records

 2013

Exceptional autumn influx

10 Nov – A remarkable influx of 100; part of a major movement that brought thousands moving along the south coast of mainland Devon.

2014

Breeding confirmed

1 & 9 Jun – Seven on 1 Jun included a independent juvenile, providing confirmation of successful breeding. An adult was seen nest building in a small oak tree in upper Millcombe on 9 Jun and song was heard in Millcombe around the same date.

2015

Breeding confirmed

7 & 8 Jul – Successful breeding was confirmed when a fledgling was seen in Millcombe (Alan & Sandra Rowland, Andrew Jewels).

2017

Breeding confirmed

Apr to Jul – Successful breeding confirmed: a pair were mating in Millcombe on 29 Apr (Tim Jones) and a recently fledged juv was seen near Millcombe House on 5 Jul (Mike Archer).

Turtle Dove

Streptopelia turtur

[European Turtle Dove] (pp.141–142)

All new records

2008

New records

27 Apr to 7 Jun – In line with this species' poor showing in recent years, the maximum daily count did not exceed one during spring passage, with records of single birds on 13 dates. There were no autumn sightings reported.

2009

For the first time in many years there were no spring records.

New record

24 Sep – One; the only autumn record.

2010

New records

28 Apr to 3 Jun – Singles recorded on 16 dates; a slightly better showing than in recent years but still pitiful by the standards of LFS records from the 1950s until the mid-1990s. There were no autumn records.

2011

New records

6 to 26 May – Singles on 6, 23, 24 & 26 May, plus two on 7 May. There were no autumn records.

2012

New record

18 May – One photographed outside Brambles; the only record for the year.

2013

Summary

Not reliably recorded during either spring or autumn passage (though there was an unconfirmed report of one on 18 Jun). Apparently the first completely blank year since LFS records began.

2014

New records

18 Apr to 13 Jun – One on 18 Apr (High Street and campsite area) was followed by records of ones and twos on a further 19 dates up to and including 13 Jun. Three were present on 25 May. Not recorded during autumn passage.

2015

New records

27 Apr to 25 May – During spring migration, single birds (involving probably only one or two long-staying individuals) were reported on 27 Apr (Quarter Wall gate) and on 15 dates 2–25 May, including singles in Millcombe on 3rd, 16–19th & 23rd. Two sightings on 11 May, around the farm at 15.00 hrs and in Millcombe half-an-hour later may have been of different birds. Not recorded during autumn passage.

2016

New records

4 to 28 May – Records on seven days: one on 4th at the top of Puffin Slope; another was by Government House on 5th – probably the same bird seen in the vicinity of the Lighthouse Field (Tim Smith) on the same date. There were further singles on 8th (Millcombe, John Turner), 9th (on track by Tillage Field) and 10th & 12th (Millcombe, Tim Smith) and all of these sightings could conceivably have related to just one individual. Another by the dung heap in the Lighthouse Field on 28th seems likely to have been the same bird that flew up from the west sidings to land by the wall running up to the Old Light (Paul Holt, Richard & Rebecca Taylor).

10 Sep – One, location not specified, was the only autumn record.

2017

New records

Not recorded in spring. Two records in autumn:

24 Aug – One seen briefly in Millcombe and St John’s Valley (Rosie Hall, Rebecca & Richard Taylor, Tony Taylor).

8 Oct – A first-winter bird was photographed by the main track on this unusually late date (Julian Arkell).

2018

New records

25 May – One feeding on the main track just north of Quarter Wall (Ken & Joan Saul).

30 May– One preening on rock above The Battery (Tony Taylor).

3 Jun – One flew up Millcombe.

Collared Dove

Streptopelia decaocto

[Eurasian Collared Dove] (p.141)

Selected new records

2016

Unusual location for spring migrant

6 Jun – Very unusually, one was seen at The Battery.

2017

Unusual locations for spring migrants

22 May – A total of six included five at Long Roost and one at Gannets’ Combe, both unusual locations for this species.

Cuckoo

Cuculus canorus

[Common Cuckoo] (pp.143–144)

All new records

 

Earliest and latest since 2006 (last year covered in full by The Birds of Lundy): Earliest 23 Apr 2009 (one); Latest 30 Aug 2013 (one, juv).

2008

Summary of new records

26 Apr to 4 Jun – Single adults on eight dates, plus two mobbed by Meadow Pipits on 1 Jun. A juvenile was seen on 8 Aug – the first confirmation of breeding since 1999.

2009

Summary of new records

23 Apr to 26 Jun – Single adults on eight dates, plus two adults on 4 May.

2 Jun – Successful breeding confirmed; juvenile being fed by Meadow Pipits near the Terrace Heligoland Trap.

25 & 26 Jun – A juvenile, perhaps the same as on 2 Jun, was seen in Millcombe; there was no indication that this bird was still being fed by its host parents.

2010

Summary of new records

9 May to 11 Jun – Single adults on four dates, plus two on 11 & 12 May. No indication of breeding.

2011

Summary of new records

3 to 30 May – Singles recorded on nine dates, plus two on 4th & 5th (including an exhausted female on the latter date). No indication of breeding.

2012

Summary of new records

1 May to 13 Jun – Single adults on ten dates.

9 to 11 Jul – Breeding was confirmed for only the third time this century when a juvenile accompanied by its host parent, a Meadow Pipit, was seen at Tibbetts on 9th and below the Upper East Side Path between the stile in Halfway Wall and the northern end of the Terrace on 11th (R. Charlwood).

2013

Summary of new records

16 May to 20 Jun – Adults recorded on nine dates.

23 Jul – One (age not given) reported at Halfway Wall.

30 Aug – A fully grown juvenile, thought more likely to be a passage migrant than a Lundy-hatched bird, below the Terrace.

2014

Summary of new records

Apr to Jun: Two on 21 Apr (one calling at the Cheeses; one in North Quarry), one on 13 May (calling near Quarter Wall, in flight over Millcombe and at South End) and one on 20–22 Jun (Millcombe).

Jul/Aug: Singles were reported on 31 Jul and 21, 23 & 29 Aug.

2015

Summary of new records

23 Apr to 16 Jun – There were spring and early summer records on 13 dates between 23 Apr (one calling and perched on gate post by Blue Bung) and 16 Jun. Most involved single birds, but two were in St Helen’s Copse on 30 Apr and there were two calling males (Millcombe/St John’s Valley area) on 15 & 16 Jun. Observation of plumage suggested that these were second-year birds.

24 Aug – The only autumn record, of a juvenile in Millcombe. It seems likely that this was a passage migrant fledged elsewhere.

2016

Summary of new records

21 Apr to 20 Jun – Recorded on 11 dates from 21 Apr to 20 Jun, but there was no evidence of breeding. After one or two males in Millcombe on 21 Apr, there were no further reports until 30 May, when one or two were seen at different times north of St Helen’s Copse, above Benjamin’s Chair and in Millcombe. Single birds were seen daily for the next five days, up to and including 4 Jun, all in the vicinity of Millcombe. One was on the Terrace on 8 Jun, whilst the final three records of the year were on 13th, 18th and 20th Jun, when one flew from Millcombe to St Helen’s Copse, mobbed by Meadow Pipits and Carrion Crows.

2017

Summary of new records

28 Apr to 24 Jul – Singles on 28–30 Apr, two on 5 May, one on 29 May and singles on 23 & 24 Jul were the only records in what appears to have been a very poor year for this species.

Tawny Owl

Strix aluco

(p.145)

All new records

2010

22 Mar – A male was heard hooting in Millcombe at 23.00 hrs (E. Sterns & P. Atkin). This is the first record since 1978 and only the 11th ever for the island. 

Little Owl

Athene noctua

(p.145)

All new records

2018

New record

10 Nov – One was seen briefly at dusk, perched on a wall near the crossroads at the head of St John’s Valley (Richard Campey). It dropped onto the ground for a couple of seconds, before flying down the valley towards Brambles and was not seen again. This is only the fifth record for Lundy after singles in 15 Jun 1933, 7 Nov 1944, 1 Jun 1955 and 1 Jun 1984.

Long-eared Owl

Asio otus

(pp.145–146)

All new records

2007

New record

25 & 26 Oct – One seen at night on 25th sitting on wall near the site of the old incinerator (between Castle Hill and Benjamin’s Chair). Allowed approach to within c.20 feet, then flew off. A long-winged owl seen flying over Millcombe at dusk on 26th was presumably the same individual (R.J. Taylor et al.). This constitutes the 19th Lundy record and the 2nd for 2007, following one in May. Record accepted by the Devon Bird Recorder.

2008

New record

28 Oct – One was trapped and ringed in Millcombe (R.A. Duncan et al.). This constitutes the 20th Lundy record. Record accepted by the Devon Bird Recorder.

2012

New record

28 & 29 Sep – One seen and photographed at roost in pines on the northern side of Millcombe on 28 & 29 Sep (Andy Jayne et al.). Attention was first drawn to it by scolding Goldcrests and Chaffinches. The owl seemed entirely unperturbed by people passing within two metres of it on the nearby path. Record accepted by the Devon Bird Recorder; the 21st for Lundy. Photo © Andrew Cleave.

2013

New record

24 Mar – One landed on the windowsill of Pigs’ Paradise during the afternoon (Grant Sherman & Shelley Southon). Record accepted by Devon Bird Recorder; the 22nd for Lundy. Photo © Grant Sherman.

Nightjar

Caprimulgus europaeus

[European Nightjar] (pp.147–148)

All new records

2008

New record

17 May – One disturbed from its roost on a rock among rhododendrons along the Lower East Side Path, just south of the Terrace, during the late morning, quickly flew out of sight (J. Diamond). It was seen briefly in flight over rhododendrons in the same general area at dusk the same day, having perhaps been attracted to Nightjar song and calls being played from a notebook computer (T. Jones). This is only the 7th occurrence since 1970.

2009

New record

25 May – One seen at dusk on 25 May, near the gate between the Upper East Side Path and the top of Millcombe. The bird circled low over scrub close to the observer, then flew off north along the East Side (Mike Jackson). The 8th record since 1970.

2010

New record

9 May – One was flushed from ground cover halfway along the main track to the Castle (R. Campey); the 9th record since 1970.

Alpine Swift

Apus melba

(p.149)

All new records

2012

New record

28 Mar to 5 Apr – One watched flying around South West Point for about 15 minutes on 28 Mar (Grant Sherman & Shelley Southon), and swooping low around Stoneycroft for about four minutes before heading off north-east on 29 Mar (Richard Brown & Robert Pugh). A swift that seems highly likely to have been the same bird was seen over Pondsbury on 25 Mar (Darrin Dowding & Paul Bullock). It was subsequently reported from the Rocket Pole area on 31 Mar (anonymous) and 3 Apr (Rod & Liz Thomas) and over Goat Island on 5 Apr (Joshua & Martin Harris). Record accepted by DBRC – the sixth Lundy record and the first since 1976.

Swift

Apus apus

[Common Swift] (p.148)

Selected new records

 

Earliest and latest since 2006 (last year covered in full by The Birds of Lundy): Earliest 17 Apr 2014 (one); Latest 28 Sep 2007 (three).

2008 to 2011

Summary

Numbers were generally low during this period, with the highest spring count being 166 on 11 May 2010 and the maximum ‘autumn’ count just 50, on 7 Aug 2008. The Breeding Birds Survey index for Swift declined by 29% in England between 1995 and 2008 (source: www.bto.org), with the factors responsible thought to include loss of nesting sites and a decline in the abundance of insects due to the widespread use of pesticides (source: www.rspb.org.uk). A run of generally cool, damp summers from 2007 – 2011 in much of western Britain may have also depressed breeding success and/or made Lundy unattractive as a late-summer feeding area. 2011 was perhaps the worst year on record for this species, with LFS logbook entries for just 17 dates and only one count reaching double digits: 10 on 2 May, though under-recording in summer may also be an issue.

 2012

Exceptional spring-passage count

30 Apr – An estimated 1,000 passed through the island in poor weather, probably displaced much further west than normal during strong easterly winds. Seven were trapped (by flick-netting) and ringed, exceeding the total of six Swifts ringed on Lundy during the whole of the period 1947-2011. Only 50 were seen a day later, on 1 May, but numbers increased again to 200 on 2nd, returning to much lower, more normal levels thereafter.

2015

Late dates in autumn

11 & 28 Sep – Two birds were seen on both dates. The latter equals the latest record since The Birds of Lundy book was published in 2007.

2017

Notable spring-passage count

5 May – A high count of 145, including many flying in off the sea along the West Side during a period of strong easterly winds, which appeared to have displaced arriving migrants further west than intended (Tim Davis & Tim Jones).

Pallid Swift

Apus pallidus

Species added to the Lundy List since The Birds of Lundy was published in 2007

All new records

2016

New record

25 Oct – One over Millcombe (Chris Baillie, Justin Zantboer et al.) was the first for Lundy. Record accepted by BBRC. See here for full details

Kingfisher

Alcedo atthis

[Common Kingfisher] (p.149)

All new records

2009

New record

27 Jun – One called several times off North End between Puffin Gully and the North Light landing steps. The bird was then seen flying about 50m into Puffin Gully and back out again (Stephen Westcott). This is the 14th LFS record and the first since Jun 1999.

2015

New records

A record year with four sightings, probably all relating to dispersing juveniles. All 14 previous records involved just one sighting in a given year, so 2015 was exceptional.

25 Jun – One flew in and landed next to a rockpool at Brazen Ward, staying for 30 seconds (unattributed).

13 to 27 Sep – One flew past North Light landing stage and into Kittiwake Gully on 13th (Sue & Rob Waterfield). One, calling in flight, flew south below North Light and disappeared from view towards the bottom of Puffin Slope on 18th (Tim Jones). One flew past Pyramid Rock on 27th (Sue & Rob Waterfield). These sightings could potentially refer to a single long-staying bird.

2016

New record

16 Aug – One was seen in the vicinity of the Devil’s Kitchen (Alex Foy).

Bee-eater

Merops apiaster

[European Bee-eater] (pp.149–150)

All new records

2010

New record

6 Jun – One, seen and heard calling in Millcombe, perched on treetops and fence posts, but was constantly harried by Starlings, a Blackbird and a Meadow Pipit before flying off after about half-an-hour (Tim Davis & Tim Jones). Record accepted by DBRC. This is only the fifth record for Lundy, but four of these have been since 2002.

Hoopoe

Upupa epops

[Eurasian Hoopoe] (pp.150–151)

All new records

2011

New records

27 Mar to 7 Apr – Two birds were seen at various locations, including Pig’s Paradise and the water tanks near Stoneycroft, on 27 Mar (Roger Fursdon et al.), with one remaining in the Millcombe area until last seen on 7 Apr. Record accepted by DBRC.

2013

New record

6 to 8 May – One was first seen in flight near the western end of Halfway Wall at Jenny’s Cove on 6th and then further east, along the main track near Halfway Wall Gate, on 7th & 8th (Simon Dell, Grant Sherman et al.). Record accepted by Devon Bird Recorder.

2014

New record

10 to 26 Mar – One was in Millcombe gardens during the early morning of 10 Mar and later that day at Benjamin’s Chair, near the Church, in St Helen’s Field and perched on the wall in front of Barton Cottages (Pete Lambden, Beccy MacDonald et al.). It remained on the island until 26 March, frequenting the areas mentioned above, as well as the track to the Castle. Record accepted by Devon Bird Recorder.

 

Photo: Hoopoe outside the Tavern (!), 10 Mar 2014 © Grant Sherman

2015

New records

12 to 15 Apr – One near Mousehole & Trap at 13.00 hrs on 12th (Phil & Pat Johnson) was probably the same individual photographed feeding on the ground and seen in flight on the northern side of Gannets’
Combe on 15th (Tim Jones).

13 May – One seen and photographed in and around Millcombe (Chris & Carol Baillie, Lisa Ostenson et al.).

Records accepted by Devon Bird Recorder.

2017

New record

3 May – One was in Gannets’ Combe (Tim Davis). Record accepted by Devon Bird Recorder.

Wryneck

Jynx torquilla

[Eurasian Wryneck] (pp.151–152)

All new records

2008

New records

31 Aug – A first-year bird around the walls of the Tillage Field and later in the village area was trapped and ringed (N. Croton, A.M. & R.J. Taylor).
13, 14 & 17 Sep – one in Millcombe (A. Williams). Records accepted by the Devon County Recorder.

2009

New records

4 May – One was flushed from the Upper East Side Path just below Quarry Cottages (John Horton).
4 Sep – A first-year bird was trapped, ringed and relased in Millcombe (Richard Taylor, Tony Taylor).
10 & 11 Sep – What was probably a different bird to that on 4 Sep (there being no obvious sign of a ring), was in Quarter Wall Copse (Malcolm Shakespeare, Richard Taylor).
Records accepted by Devon Bird Recorder.

2010

New records

19 Apr – One in Lower Millcombe (M. Langman).
9 Sep – One in Millcombe (R. Taylor) and one in Gannets’ Combe (D. Leech).
Records accepted by Devon Bird Recorder.

2011

New records

1 Oct – One in Millcombe (J. Diamond et al.).
2–6 Oct – One on Terrace just south of Heligoland Trap and another along Lower East Path between Quarter Wall Copse and St. Helen’s Copse on 2 Oct, both of these birds remaining in the same locations until 6 Oct (J. Diamond et al.)Records accepted by Devon Bird Recorder.

Photo: Wryneck, October 2011 © Tom Bedford.

2013

New records

26 Aug – One in Millcombe (Richard & Rebecca Taylor).

24 & 25 Sep – One in Millcombe (Chris Dee, Jan Swan, Andy Turner).

4 to 6 Oct – One mist-netted in Millcombe and ringed on 4th (John Haddaway & John Horton) was still present on 5th & 6th.

Records accepted by Devon Bird Recorder.

2014

New records

19 to 26 Sep – One along the Lower East Side Path about 200 m south of Quarter Wall Copse on 19th remained until 22nd (Andy Jayne), with the same or another in the same general area on 26th (Chris Dee). Record accepted by Devon Bird Recorder.

2015

New record

8 Apr – One trapped in Millcombe was ringed and photographed (Rob Duncan, Martyn Roper). This bird was part of a significant influx to western England and Wales in early Apr. Record accepted by Devon Bird Recorder.

2016

New records

Recorded on eight dates in early autumn, from 31 Aug to 23 Sep:

31 Aug – One in Millcombe (Dave Jones, Rebecca & Richard Taylor).

9 Sep – One in Millcombe (Rosie Hall, Rebecca & Richard Taylor).

14 to 17 Sep – Two together in Millcombe on 14th & 15th; one stayed to 17th, when it was trapped and ringed (A.J. Bellamy, Peter Slader, Nik Ward).

20 Sep – One on Lower East Side Path north of St Helen's Combe (Andy Jayne).

23 Sep – One on rocks along the West Side, south of The Cheeses on 23 Sep (Justin Walker & Jan Swan).

Records accepted by Devon Bird Recorder.

Great Spotted Woodpecker

Dendrocopos major

(pp.151–152)

All new records

2007

New record

18 Oct – A male seen on the Terrace during the morning was relocated in the small copse below Hanmers late in the afternoon (J. Diamond et al.). This represents the 15th occurrence on Lundy.

2008

New records

25 Jul to 26 Sep – A juvenile was seen along Quarter Wall on the evening of 25 Jul and along the wall dividing St Helen’s and Tillage Fields on the afternoon of 26th. On 27 Jul a juvenile that appeared to have a broken wing was seen on the Upper East Side Path – the remains of a Great Spotted Woodpecker, thought to have been a juvenile, were found there on 31 Jul. Surprisingly, a second juvenile was seen at various locations along the East Side on five dates between 4 & 11 Aug, followed by the same or another juvenile on four dates between 20 & 26 Sep. The Jul sightings were the first for Lundy in that month. 2008 makes a run of five consecutive years, from 2004 onwards, in which Great Spotted Woodpeckers have been seen on the island. Assuming a minimum of two individuals in 2008, these constitute the 16th and 17th records overall.

2010

New records

26 Sep to 26 Oct – One between VC Quarry and the Heligoland Trap on 26 Sep (A. Cleave et al.). One flew over Government House on 29 Sep. A female flew south along the main track on 7 Oct, alighting briefly on the corner of Barton Cottages before dropping down into Millcombe, where it was still present on 8th (A. Jayne et al.). A male was seen in Millcombe and around the Terrace Heligoland Trap from 23 to 26 Oct, and was trapped and ringed in Millcombe on 25 Oct when it was found to be a first-year bird (R. Duncan, T. Palmer, O. Slessor et al.). It is impossible to know for sure how many individuals were involved, but there was clearly at least one female (perhaps accounting for all sightings from 26 Sep to 8 Oct) and one male at the end of Oct. These therefore constitute at least the 18th and 19th records for the island.

2011

New record

1 Oct to 10 Nov – A female on the Terrace on 1 Oct (J. Diamond). Presumably the same bird was seen on a gate post at Old Light, then in Millcombe on 3rd (T. Bedford et al.). It was trapped and ringed on 13th and found to be a first-year bird (T. Ball et al.) and remained until at least 10 Nov (A. Rowland). It was retrapped on 19 Oct. About the 20th record for the island, half of which have been during the last 15 years.

2012

New records

30 Apr & 1 May – One in Millcombe on 30 Apr and 1 May (L. Armstrong, Colin McShane).

9 Sep – 18 Oct – A first-year female initially seen along the Terrace, in the willows of the southernmost quarry, on 9 Sep (Richard Taylor) had relocated to Millcombe by 11th (Michaela Cozens et al.). Two were reported on 16 Sep (Mike Townsend et al.). One was in St Helen’s Copse on 18th, while on 24th, one was seen flying from the Tent Field, past the Church and into Millcombe (Andy Jayne et al.). One was in Quarter Wall LFS Annual Report 2012 39 Copse on 27th. There is no evidence that more than two mobile birds were present, and it is assumed that these were the two individuals trapped and ringed in Millcombe on 7 Oct. The female was retrapped on 10 & 13 Oct (Tim Ball et al.). They continued to range as far as the Terrace over the next few days. Finally, one was seen on the Terrace on 17 Oct and one near Brambles on 18 Oct (Tony Taylor), the last record of the year. There have now been well over 20 occurrences of this seemingly unlikely species on the island, with a notable increase in frequency since the mid to late nineties, in line with national population trends.

2013

New record

27 Jul – A juvenile was seen from the Marisco Tavern on the post to the left of the blue door to Government House (Chris & Sharron Blackmore).

2014

New record

3 to 5 Oct – One was heard and then watched as it fed among the crevices in rocky outcrops above the Terrace between North Quarry and VC Quarry on 3 Oct (Keith Dean, Andy Turner). What was presumably the same bird was heard calling in Millcombe on 5 Oct (Luke Phillips, Tony Taylor).

2015

New record

9 & 10 Sep – A juvenile, first seen near The Ugly on 9th (Elisabeth Price) was trapped and ringed near Brambles the following day (Nik Ward et al.).

2018

New record

6 to 13 Apr – A female in Millcombe (Zoë Barton, Dean Jones et al.) was also seen in the tree outside the Laundry (!) on 7th.

Kestrel

Falco tinnunculus

[Common Kestrel] (pp.82–83)

Selected new records

2005

Update

A pair bred at a site near Quarry Beach (T. & K. Dobie); the first confirmed breeding since 1982.

2011

2012

Probable overwintering

Dec 2011 to Feb 2012 – It appears that at least one bird overwintered, as up to two were seen in Dec, with singles reported in Jan & Feb.

2016

Probable breeding

May to Aug – A pair was observed around the cliff above Quarry Beach (the site of the last successful breeding attempt in 2005) on 6 May, and both the male and female were seen in the Quarry Beach area over the following five days (Tim Smith). There were regular sightings, mainly of one or two birds, throughout the rest of May, Jun and Jul. Circumstantial evidence of successful breeding came on 20 Aug when Joshua Harris observed four Kestrels (a female, two juveniles and either another juvenile or a male) hunting around the rock buttresses below Tibbetts.

 

Ringing control: A Kestrel ringed as a pullus (nestling) on 18 Jun 2009 (Finnish ring no. S248850) at Vesilahti, Hame, Finland (61° 16’N 23° 41’E), was controlled on Lundy on 21 Sep 2009 (95 days; 2,070 km; 238°). This is only the second Kestrel ringing movement involving Lundy and the first featuring a foreign-ringed bird.

Merlin

Falco columbarius

(pp.85–88)

Selected new records

2008

Record set for highest count ever

14 Oct – A new Lundy record of at least six individuals on a single day was set. Four were recorded daily from 20-22 Oct.

2010

Record equalled for highest count ever

10 Nov – A count of six individuals equalled the record set in 2008.

2013

 Female Merlin, October 2013 ©Richard Campey.

2016

Potential Icelandic-race female

27 Oct – A large female was considered a good candidate for the Icelandic race F. c. subaesalon (Mark Darlaston, Adele Rennells), probably a rare annual visitor to Devon, though confirmation requires in-hand measurements (2016 Devon Bird Report).

Peregrine

Falco peregrinus

[Peregrine Falcon] (pp.85–88)

Selected new records

 

Correction The reference to Upton 1980 on p.86, line 8, should read "(Upton 1968)". The full reference for Gurney 1921 on p.86, which is missing from the bibliography, is: Gurney, J.H. 1921. Early Annals of Ornithology. London: H.F. & G. Witherby.

 

Photo: Peregrine from the Terrace, 25 Apr 2014 © Richard Campey

2008

Bred successfully.

2009

Bred successfully.

2010

Bred successfully.

2011

Bred successfully.

2012

Bred successfully.

2013

Bred successfully.

2014

Bred successfully, but only one young known to have fledged.

2015

Bred successfully.

2016

Bred successfully.

2017

Bred successfully.

 

Colour-ring sighting: An individual carrying a metal ring on its right leg and a yellow ring marked with black ‘H2’ on its left leg was photographed by Nicola Saunders (Lundy Warden) along the Lower East Side Path on 11 Apr 2008. The bird had been ringed as a chick, hatched on 28 May 2006, on the north coast of the Cornish mainland between St Ives and Portreath (R. Hunkin, pers. comm.). This is the first direct evidence of dispersal to Lundy by a known mainland-bred Peregrine.

Red-backed Shrike

Lanius collurio

(pp.230–231)

All new records

2010

New record

18 May – A male was seen and photographed on the Millcombe side of The Ugly, and later in the area cleared of rhododendron between The Ugly and St Helen’s Combe (S. Barnes, R. Fowling). Record accepted by DBRC.

2012

New records

2 Jun – A male just west of the main track at Quarter Wall (T. Davis & T. Jones et al.).

7 Oct – A first-winter bird was close to the main track near Gannets’ Combe (A. Williams, I. Lakin).

Records accepted by the Devon Bird Recorder.

2016

New record

31 Aug – A first-year bird was in Millcombe (Dave Jones, Rebecca & Richard Taylor). Record accepted by Devon Bird Recorder.

Red-backed Shrike Millcombe 31Aug2016 Richard Taylor Red-backed Shrike, Millcombe,
31 Aug 2016
© Richard Taylor

Great Grey Shrike

Lanius excubitor

(p.232)

All new records

2015

16 & 17 Oct – One, first seen in flight over St John’s Valley (James Diamond, Tim Jones et al.) and hovering at height near the Church in the early morning of 16th, flew north-west over the village but could not be found again that day in spite of intensive searching. It was relocated in Millcombe, on the south-facing slopes of The Ugly, on the morning of 17th (Ivan Lakin, Kevin Rylands et al.) and showed well in the same area for the rest of the day, perching prominently on blackthorn to watch intently for passing bumble-bees, which it seized in flight. This bird was part of a significant and unusually early influx of Great Grey Shrikes to Britain, primarily along the east coast, with at least ten in Norfolk alone on 16th. This constitutes only the second occurrence for Lundy, the first dating back some 41 years when a first-year female was trapped and ringed on the Terrace on 22 Oct 1974. Record accepted by Devon Bird Recorder.

Woodchat Shrike

Lanius senator

(pp.232–233)

All new records

2009

New record

27 Jun – One was seen at Quarter Wall and on the wall between the Brick Field and main track on 27 Jun (K. Sawyer, C. Wood et al.). Record accepted by DBRC.

2010

New record

17 May – One in upper Millcombe (D. Illing, Enslin family). Record accepted by DBRC.

2012

New record

19 May – A male photographed as it perched on Threequarter Wall (R. Morris). Record accepted by DBRC. Photo © Rick Morris.

2014

New records

12 May – A male at the North End on 12 May was found by David Collins, who noted: “The bird was first seen in the vicinity of the ‘rail tracks’ which lead from the North Light to the top of the cove where the landing place is on the east shore. It then flew up towards the plateau and was seen perched on the little bridge just before you descend to the lighthouse. It was then observed feeding from rocks along the cliff-top on the east side before we lost it. It caught and ate a large beetle.”

27 to 31 May – A male on 27 May, first seen near the Old Light and making its way south along the walls, was later perched on a fence to the west of the Church. On 28th it was seen in St John’s Valley, close to the Church again, and on the fence-line between the top of Millcombe and St Helen’s Field (where it was watched taking beetles and caterpillars). It was in the same area on 30th, while by 31st it had moved to the western end of Quarter Wall (P. Holt, Richard Taylor, Tony Taylor et al.)

Records accepted by DBRC.

It is possible that all of these records refer to a single long-staying bird, but it seems more probable that two individuals were involved given the lengthy gap between sightings of what is a pretty conspicuous species.

2018

New record – subject to aceptance by DBRC

24 to 28 May – One was at Quarter Wall, initially just east of the main track on 24th (Ken & Joan Saul), but had moved to the western end of the wall by 27th (Rebecca & Rich Taylor, Tony Taylor et al.) and was still present there on 28th (Martin Thorne).

Red-eyed Vireo

Vireo olivaceus

(p.248)

All new records

2018

New record –subject to acceptance by BBRC

19 to 22 Oct – One showed well in Millcombe on 19th (Dean Jones et al.). What is presumed to be the same bird, but conceivably a second individual given the number of Nearctic landbirds appearing in Britain and Ireland during the second half of Oct 2018, was seen briefly near Brambles on 22nd (Andy Jayne). Record subject to acceptance by BBRC; if accepted this will be the eighth Lundy record; the  last was in Sep 2005.

Red-eyed Vireo 19Oct2018 Dean JonesRed-eyed Vireo, Millcombe, 19 Oct 2018
© Dean Jones

Golden Oriole

Oriolus oriolus

[Eurasian Golden Oriole] (pp.229–230)

All new records

2008

New records

28 Apr to 5 May – One in Millcombe on the evening of 28 April (S. Wheatley) and caught and ringed the following day (C. McShane et al.) was found to be an immature male in a rather emaciated state. It was retrapped on 2 May and (presumably the same bird) was still present on 5 May, when seen in the field (J. Horton & P. Simpson). Between initial capture and retrapping, the bird's weight increased from a poor 54g to a rather more healthy 64g. A photograph of the bird in the hand is included in the 2008 LFS logbook. Record accepted by DBRC.

22 May – An immature male was seen in Millcombe (M. Shakespeare). Record accepted by DBRC.

2011

New records

10 to 16 Apr – A male was in Millcombe (I. Campbell, E. Dowding et al.).

7 to 10 May – A female or immature in Millcombe (S. Barnes, E. Davis, J.W. Leonard et al.)

Records accepted by DBRC.

2012

New records

3 to 30 May – In spite of (or perhaps because of) the atrocious spring weather, 2012 was an exceptionally good year for this species on Lundy, with several different individuals – probably five or more – occurring in May. A male first seen and photographed in Millcombe on 3rd (D. Fox, L. Jones et al.) was trapped and ringed there on 4th (S. Petrek) and was still present on 5th. A female was reported about 500 m north of South West Point on 4th. Two birds, a male and a duller female/immature male, were in Millcombe on 6th (J. Leonard, D. Powell). A male was still in Millcombe on 7th & 8th (I. Searle) and what may have been the same bird was seen a few hours later on a wall by the forge; it flew off south when disturbed (I. Searle). Early on 9th, two birds (male and female/immature male) were seen and photographed outside Government House (G. Cooper). A comparison of the available images suggests that the males photographed on 3/4 and 9 May were two different individuals, with the first a much brighter, more strongly marked bird. What seem likely to have been the same two birds as seen on 9th continued to be recorded in the Millcombe area until 12 May, on which date the same or another male was “between Old Light and pond” (M. Vacker). A first-summer male was in St John’s Valley, Millcombe and St Helen’s Copse on 20th (R. Andrews & G. Saul, M. Jones et al.) and a female or immature male was in Millcombe on 29 May (R. Skeates) and in Quarter Wall Copse on 30 May (T. Davis & T. Jones). Records accepted by DBRC.

Photo: Golden Oriole, near Government House, 9 May 2012 © Graham Cooper

2013

New record

23 Apr – A male was in the St John’s Valley and Millcombe area (David Clifton, Rob Skeates et al.). Record accepted by DBRC.

What were possibly the remains of a Golden Oriole were found on the Lower East Side Path, between Millcombe and St Helen’s Combe, on 8 May.

2014

New records

24 & 25 May – One was in and around Millcombe on 24 & 25 May (Ian Hartley, Paul Holt, Richard Taylor). Record accepted by DBRC. What seems likely to have the same bird was reported on 18 & 21–23 May but no supporting information was received by either the Lundy or Devon Bird Recorders. Record accepted by DBRC.

2015

New record

10 & 13 May – What seems likely to have been the same female or immature male was in the St Helen’s Copse area on 10th (Brian Thompson et al., Devon Birds day trip) and in Millcombe on 13th (Chris Baillie/A Rocha group). Record accepted by DBRC.

2016

New records

12 May – One in Millcombe (Tim Smith).

12 & 15 Jun – One in Lower Millcombe (Alan & Sandra Rowland) on 12th, whilst a sound recording was made of a calling bird in Quarter Wall Copse on 15th (Malcolm Gibbs).

Records accepted by DBRC.

2018

New records – subject to acceptance by DBRC

31 May – A male in Millcombe was singing first thing and last seen flying high across the valley to the north at around 10.30 hrs (Tony Taylor et al.).

4 & 5 Sep – A female or immature was in Millcombe (Rebecca & Rich Taylor, Tony Taylor et al.). If accepted, this will be only the second autumn record for Lundy, the first dating back as far as 11 Oct 1967!

Chough

Pyrrhocorax pyrrhocorax

[Red-billed Chough] (pp.234–235)

All new records

2012

New record

29 Oct to end of year – What was thought to be a calling Chough was heard from the direction of South West Point during an early morning migration watch from Castle Hill on 29 Oct (Tim Jones), but without visual confirmation. Tony Taylor later reported glimpsing for a second or two what he thought was a Chough in the same area. An adult was seen and photographed at Shutter Point on 30 Oct (Paul Barrett). What is presumed to be the same bird was seen near the Rocket Pole on 15 & 16 Nov and also near Benson’s Cave on 15th (James Leonard, Ed & Ellie Bassett et al.). It was again at Shutter Point on 18 Nov (Andrew Taylor) and on the southern edge of Castle Hill on 21 Nov (Kay Easton). There were no further reports until 9 Dec, when it was foraging and in flight just east of the Devil’s Limekiln (David Oddy). On 18 Dec it was seen from the (upstairs) living room of Square Cottage (Keith Lugg). Finally, it was photographed sitting on the Church on 27 Dec, when it was also seen in flight being mobbed by a Raven (A. McGibbon). This is the first record since one off the East Side on 28 Dec 2000, though there was an unconfirmed report of one near the Devil’s Slide on 1 Sep 2010. Record accepted by DBRC.

Photo: Chough near Shutter Point, 30 Oct 2012 © Paul Barrett.

2013

New records

1 Jan to 30 Mar – The bird that arrived in Oct 2012 continued to be seen regularly up to and including the last record on 30 Mar, when it was feeding in St Helen’s Field. All logbook entries for Jan–Mar involved sightings in the south of the island, from Old Light, to St Helen’s Field, Millcombe/St John’s Valley, Tent Field and South End. St Helen’s Field and the paths between the Tavern and Millcombe appeared to be especially favoured feeding areas from mid-Feb onwards.

18 & 19 May – There were further sightings (presumed to relate to other individuals, since the overwintering bird was not seen in April, in spite of thorough searching) reported in mid-May: one feeding in field just north of High Street gate and seen and heard in flight near Jenny’s Cove on 18 May (N. & D. Downie, J. & S. Buchanan) and one seen and heard calling over Millcombe on 19 May (Viv Phillips, Kim Atkinson & Jan Ozyer).

All the above records accepted by DBRC. In addition there was an unsubstantiated report of two on 8 May.

Photo © Mike Jones, March 2013.

Jackdaw

Corvus monedula

[Western Jackdaw] (p.235)

All new records

2007

New record

18 Oct – A notable influx of 31 birds (the fourth-highest total ever recorded) occurred, together with 18 Rooks. The mixed flock arrived during the morning from the north and circled high over the South End. Most birds landed in the Tillage Field, but all had left by early afternoon.

2008

New record

23 Apr – One feeding in the Tillage Field.

2009

New records

14 & 15 Mar – Four flying north landed amongst sheep in the Brick Field on 14th, remaining to 15th.

16 Apr – Five in Middle Park.

6 to 8 May – Four on 6th, unspecified number of 7th and six on 8th (locations not recorded).

2010

New records

13 to 20 May – Daily sightings of a single bird, with two on 15th, then one on 26 & 28 May and on nine dates from 5 to 25 Jun (possibly just one long-staying individual?).

13 to ?? Jul – Two on 13th and a single bird on three dates at the end of the month.

4 Sep – One around the Village.

2011

New records

28 & 29 Apr – Four on 28th were seen leaving the island with three Carrion Crows, flying high to the south-east towards Hartland Point at 18.05 hrs on 29th.

27 & 30 May – One sitting on eastern end of Halfway Wall on 27th and on Tillage Field wall on 30th.

2012

New record

26 Apr – Two in the south of the island (Jeremy Barker).

2013

New record

23 May – One (Neil Trout).

2014

New records

27 Apr – One on roof of Black Shed and later feeding in Tillage Field and St Helen’s Field (Richard Campey).

8 Jul – Two were around the Landing Bay on what is an unusual date for this species on Lundy (Cambridge Conservation Volunteers).

Photo: Jackdaw in Tillage Field, 27 Apr 2014 © Richard Campey

2015

New records

10 May – One (P. Treen).

27 May – One at Brazen Ward and in the Brick/Tillage Fields (Philip & Helen Lymbery).

6 Jun – One  in the Tillage Field and later over the Airfield (Richard Campey).

2016

New record

31 Jul – One near Jenny's Cove.

2017

New records

24 to 27 Mar – Two on 24th & 25th, three on 26th and four on 27th (Tim Davis & Tim Jones et al.). All four birds were seen flying north above the Terrace on the latter date, apparently leaving the island.

29 Apr to 1 May – One on 29th & 30th, followed by two in the Lighthouse Field on 1st (Neil Trout).

2018

New record

22 Feb – One in Barton Field (Dean Jones).

16 Mar – One with roosting flock of Carrion Crows (Dean Jones).

25 & 26 Mar – One Tent Field on 25th and St Helen's Field on 26th (Tony Taylor)

Rook

Corvus frugilegus

(pp.236–237)

All new records

2007

New record

18 Oct – A notable influx of 18 occurred, together with 31 Jackdaws. The mixed flock arrived during the morning from the north and circled high over the South End. Most birds landed in the Tillage Field, but all had left by early afternoon.

2009

New records

5 & 6 Feb – One in Lighthouse Field.

13 & 15 Mar – One in Brick Field

14 Sep – Two (circumstances unknown).

2010

New records

22 Mar – One seen from Brazen Ward.

10 May – One around Brick Field and Airfield.

30 May – Ten (no location given).

16 Jul – One.

2013

New record

19 Apr – Four flew north past lower Millcombe, calling as they went, before turning west, rising over the fields and out of sight (Tony Taylor).

2015

New records

16 Apr – One calling as it circled high over the Village (Tim Jones).

10 May – One at Quarter Wall.

30 May – One (location not given, B. Boyland/BirdTrack).

2016

New records

1 to 10 Jun – One, first seen in the Tillage Field on 1st was recorded on six further dates up to 10th (Paul Holt, Richard & Rebecca Taylor & Tony Taylor).

13 Sep to 11 Oct – A single bird was seen on eight dates from 13 to 25 Sep (Andy Turner et al.), followed by the same or another on 11 Oct.

2017

New record

May to Aug – One on 29 & 30 May (Chris Townend) and, what was considered to be the same long-staying individual, on a further 19 dates up to and including 26 Aug (Dean Jones, Richard & Rebecca Taylor, Tony Taylor et al.). Most sightings were from the vicinity of the Tillage Field and pig-sty.

Carrion Crow

Corvus corone

(p.237)

Selected new records

2007

Maximum counts

30 Apr – The highest spring count: 55.

12 Nov – The highest autumn count: 47.

2008

Maximum counts

28 Feb – The highest late-winter/early-spring count: 57.

19 Oct – The highest autumn count: 54.

The population remains at a high level in comparison with preceding decades; from 1960 to 2006 counts of 50 or more had been made on only a handful of occasions.

2009

Maximum counts

16 Apr – The highest spring count: 52.

25 Aug – The highest autumn count: 60.

2010

Maximum counts

8 May – The highest spring count: 47.

28 Oct – The highest autumn count: 44.

2011

Maximum counts

29 Apr – The highest spring count: 63.

7–9 Nov – The highest autumn count: 40.

2012

Maximum counts

31 May – The highest spring count: 52.

23 Oct – The highest autumn count: 64.

2013

Maximum counts

22 May – The highest spring count: 48.

24 Nov – The highest autumn count: 59.

2014

Maximum counts

24 Apr – The highest spring count: 50.

31 Dec – The highest autumn/winter count: 70. This matches the previous all-time record high count, when an estimate of the island's population gave a "likely total in excess of 70 individuals" in spring 2007.

2015

Maximum counts

May – The highest spring count: 49.

10 Oct – The highest autumn count: 75. This sets a new record high count for the island.

2016

Maximum counts

3 Apr – The highest spring count: 60.

20 Oct – The highest autumn count: 68.

2017

Maximum counts

22 Mar – The highest spring count: 49.

9 Oct – The highest autumn count: only 48, suggesting indifferent to poor breeding productivity.

Hooded Crow

Corvus cornix

(p.238)

All new records

2010

New records

25 Mar – One with Carrion Crows in the Brick Field (K. Welsh).

29 & 30 May – One (P.J. Lymbery & H. Engelen).

29 Jun – One between Pondsbury and Halfway Wall (H. McLiffe).

2012

New record

17–28 May – One photographed on the West Side, just north of the Devil’s Slide on 17 May (M. Jones) remained until 28th and was seen by many observers at a variety of locations (though all south of Quarter Wall). Record accepted by DBRC.

2014

New record

14 to 16 Jun – One was in and around the Brick Field (Adam Bainbridge, Shaun Barnes, Kevin Welsh et al.). Record accepted by DBRC.

Hooded Crow in Brick Field on 16 Jun 2014 © Grant Sherman

2018

Possible Carrion Crow x Hooded Crow hybrid

20, 21 & 28 Mar – One, initially seen on Ackland's Moor on 20th (Rob Waterfield), was at Quarter Wall on 21st (Dean Jones). Presumably the same individual was in Tillage Field on 28th (Grant & Shelley Sherman). Dean Jones noted "Obvious contrast in colouration of head and wings to the rest of the bird's body but body colouration much darker than typical Hooded Crow."

Raven

Corvus corax

[Northern Raven] (pp.238–240)

Selected new records

2009

Maximum counts

13 Sep – A count of 14 was one of the higher totals of recent years (which also include 14 in Oct 2005, and 19 in Oct 2002).

2010

Maximum counts

11 Oct – A count of 20 was the highest since 19 in 2002.

2011

Maximum counts

29 Apr & 14 Oct – Counts of 16 on both dates were the highest of the year.

2012

Maximum counts

11 Apr – A count of 16 was the highest of the year.

2013

Maximum counts

28 Aug – A count of 17 was the highest of the year.

2014

Maximum counts

Jun – A count of 14 was the highest of the year.

2015

Maximum counts

Mar & Oct – Counts of 13 were the highest of the year.

2016

Maximum counts

6 Oct – A count of 17 was the highest of the year.

2017

Maximum counts

16 Sep – A count of 20 was the highest since 2010 and involved “a mobile gang of presumed adolescents flying over the village area in at least two separate groups calling very loudly” (Dean Jones).

2018

Commencement of breeding

1 Feb – A pair watched carrying sticks to a nest site on the East Side.

Waxwing

Bombycilla garrulus

[Bohemian Waxwing] (p.172)

All new records

2014

New record

20 Oct – An adult male spent about an hour (from 09.00hrs) in upper Millcombe, when it was watched and photographed at close range as it fed on berries. At one point it called and flew off strongly to the south-east, disappearing over the mouth of Millcombe and was thought probably to have left the island. However, it was relocated briefly at the mouth of St Helen’s Combe at 10.30hrs, but could not be found later in the morning (Tom Bedford, Richard Campey, James Diamond & Tim Jones). This is only the fifth LFS record, the previous four having been in Nov 1990, May 1997, Oct 2004 and Jan 2005. Record accepted by Devon Bird Recorder. Photo below ©Richard Campey.

 

Coal Tit

Periparus ater

(pp.227–228)

All new records

2008

New records

17 to 21 Oct – One on 17 Oct was joined by a second bird on 18th & 19th, with a final sighting of a single bird on 21st. All records were from either Millcombe or Quarter Wall

2010

New record

11 to 23 Oct – Recorded on ten dates, with two on 11th, three on 12th, two on 13th & 14th and singles on the remaining days. Four birds, all believed to have been of the continental race P a. ater were trapped and ringed during this period.

2012

New records

31 Mar – One in Millcombe (Derren Fox).

13 to 11 Nov – A small influx in mid-Oct involved at least five different birds. One was seen at the Castle early in the morning of 13 Oct and later in Millcombe (Ivan Lakin, Kevin Rylands). Two were trapped and ringed in Millcombe on 14 Oct, with a third individual trapped there on 15th. During the morning of 16 Oct, two were seen at St Helen’s Copse, plus an unringed bird at Quarter Wall Copse. Two were in St John’s Valley that afternoon, one of which was unringed (Richard Taylor & Tony Taylor). Over the next several days, individuals were seen regularly along the East Side, from Millcombe to the Terrace Trap, including Quarter Wall Copse and Quarry Pond. All those seen well enough in the field were carrying rings. The maximum count was three on 16 & 17 Oct, with ones and twos thereafter until 28th (many observers). However, new individuals were trapped and ringed in Millcombe on 20 & 21 Oct (Tony Taylor). There were two records of single birds in Millcombe in Nov, on 8th & 11th (Andrew Cleave, James Leonard) – perhaps one of the Oct birds that had remained otherwise undetected?

2014

New record

18 to 20 Apr – A single bird was reported daily in Millcombe (Martin Thorne); Coal Tits are particularly rare on the island in spring.

2015

New records

4 Oct to 22 Nov – There were autumn records on the unusually high total of 23 dates between 4 Oct (three birds) and 22 Nov (two), with a maximum count of four on 14 Oct, though ringing information indicated that there were at least two long-staying individuals, rather than a continuous turnover of new arrivals. Observer coverage was very low during much of Nov (and the weather largely dreadful!), so whilst there was a long gap between sightings from 2 to 22 Nov, it is possible that birds were present throughout that period. The great majority were seen in Millcombe but one was at Quarter Wall Copse on both 15 Oct and 22 Nov. Three were ringed in early Oct (one on 3rd, two on 4th); all were identified as belonging to the British subspecies P. a. britannicus and all were first-year birds. Two of the three individuals were retrapped between 28 & 30 Oct.

2016

New record

22 Feb to 27 Apr – Records of a single bird in Millcombe on 19 dates are likely all to have been of the same overwintering individual: a bird trapped on 3 Apr had been ringed on 3 October 2015. It was “singing heartily” in Millcombe on 3 Mar (Neil Trout).

There were no autumn records.

2017

New record

29 Oct to 30 Dec – Sightings, probably involving just one long-staying individual, were made on 14 dates from 29 Oct (Millcombe and also feeding with Chiffchaffs and Goldcrests along a wall above Benjamin’s Chair – Andy Jayne & Dean Jones) to 30 Dec (in Quarter Wall Copse – Dean Jones & Zoë Barton). Most reports were from Millcombe, with one additional sighting in Quarter Wall Copse on 14 Nov. This bird overwintered, being seen again in late Jan and early Feb 2018.

2018

New records

26 Jan to 1 Feb – One in Millcombe and St Helen's Copse, presumed the same individual present at the end of 2017 (Tim Davis & Tim Jones et al.).

31 Mar to 3 Apr – One very active bird, calling frequently, in Millcombe on 31st, 1st & 3rd (Dean Jones, Tony Taylor, Neil Trout).

Blue Tit

Cyanistes caeruleus

[Eurasian Blue Tit] (p.226)

All new records

2011

New records

28 Sep – One.

20 Oct to 9 Nov – Recorded on 13 dates during this period; mostly single birds (one ringed on 20th), but two were seen on 25 & 27 Oct (in Millcombe/St John’s Valley on latter date).

2012

New record

31 Mar – One in Millcombe (Norma & Trevor Dobie).

2015

New record

10 Apr – An adult female was trapped and ringed in Millcombe (Rob Duncan).

Great Tit

Parus major

(pp.226–227)

All new records

2007

New record

15 & 16 Aug – One.

2011

New records

23 Apr – One in Millcombe.

28 Sep – One (location unknown); the same date as a Blue Tit was also reported.

 

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